EM Reflections – May 2017

Thanks to Dr Paul Page for his summary

Edited by Dr David Lewis

 

Top tips from this month’s rounds:

  1. DVT – Anticoagulation Bridging… when is it needed?
  2. Anticoagulated elderly patient with minor trauma. Can we rely on a recent INR?
  3. Abdominal pain in an elderly patient. Does a nonspecific exam and normal vitals exclude serious illness?

 


DVT – Anticoagulation Bridging… when is it needed?

Consider the type of anticoagulation best suited for your patient. Remember warfarin needs bridging until therapeutic INR is achieved.  Ensure that patients discharged after hours have a robust plan for follow up and enough supply until follow up occurs.

Outpatient Management of Anticoagulation Therapy – American Family Physician 2013

 

For Warfarin therapy in DVT, Thrombosis Canada recommends:

Full-dose low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) overlapping with warfarin for at least 5 days and until the INR is at least 2.0 for at least 2 days.

 

Bridging is not required when prescribing a Direct Oral Anticoagulant (DOAC) e.g Apixaban or Rivaroxaban.

 

Thrombosis Canada tool to support decision making for Anticoagulation therapy in DVT

Management of DVT:

General measures:
Unless compression ultrasound (CUS) is rapidly available, patients with moderate-to-high suspicion of DVT (except those with a high risk of bleeding) should start anticoagulant therapy before the diagnosis is confirmed.  Imaging confirmation should be obtained as soon as possible.
Outpatient management is preferred over hospital-based treatment unless there is an additional indication for hospitalization.
Initial treatment should have an immediate anticoagulant effect. Therefore, warfarin monotherapy is not appropriate initially.

Treatment Regimens:

Depending on the clinical presentation, one of following regimens should be used for the initial 3 months:

  • Full-dose low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) overlapping with warfarin for at least 5 days and until the INR is at least 2.0 for at least 2 days.
  • Full-dose IV heparin overlapping with warfarin for at least 5 days and until the INR is at least 2.0 for at least 2 days.
  • Apixaban 10 mg PO BID for 1 week before reducing dose to 5 mg PO BID.
  • Rivaroxaban 15 mg PO BID for 3 weeks before reducing dose to 20 mg PO once daily.
  • Full-dose SC LMWH or IV heparin for at least 5-10 days before switching to dabigatran 150 mg PO BID or to edoxaban 60 mg PO once daily.
  • Full-dose LMWH alone without switching to an oral anticoagulant.
  • Full-dose LMWH for the 1st month or so before switching to a DOAC or warfarin.

 


Anticoagulated elderly patient with minor trauma. Can we rely on a recent INR?

 

Elderly patients on warfarin presenting with minor trauma are commonly seen in the ED.  Many will have been on warfarin for a prolonged period and will have stable INRs. However we can not rely on a previous INR level when assessing the current presentation. Consider the following rational:

  • Why did the patient fall?
  • Do they have a concomitant illness?
  • Are they compliant with their medication?
  • Have they been prescribed or are you considering prescribing new medication that may interact with warfarin?

Clinically Significant Drug Interactions

Anticoagulated patients frequently re-attend the ED with complications of bleeding after discharge following minor injury e.g enlarging hematoma, blood soaked dressings, missed internal bleeding, mobility failure. Consider whether admission for observation may be more appropriate than discharge in this group of patients. For those discharge ensure that they have close support and clear advice on when to return.

Practical tips for warfarin dosing and monitoring – Cleveland Clinic Journal

 

See this recent Medical Student Pearl on Reversal of Anticoagulation in the ED

Medical Student Clinical Pearl – Reversal of Anticoagulation in the Emergency Department

 


 

Abdominal pain in an elderly patient. Does a nonspecific exam and normal vitals exclude serious illness?

Elderly patients presenting to the ED with acute abdominal pain should be considered extremely high risk. Published series have reported mortality rates approaching 10% (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7091511)

Presentations can be delayed, physical exam can be innocuous, lab results can be misleading. The risk of serious pathology is much greater and the outcome of delayed diagnosis can be significant.

Abdominal emergencies in the geriatric patient – Int J Emerg Med. 2014; 7: 43.

 

 

An excellent post from ALIEM – 10 Tips for Approaching Abdominal Pain in the Elderly

After seeing your fifth young patient of the day with chronic pelvic pain, constipation, and irritable bowel syndrome, it is easy to be lulled into the mindset that abdominal pain is nothing to worry about. Not so with the elderly. These 10 tips will help focus your approach to atraumatic abdominal pain in older adults and explain why presentations are frequently subtle and diagnoses challenging.

 

Erect CXR – Abdominal Series – Free air under diaphragm in perforated bowel

 

Bottom Line –

Elderly patients with abdominal pain are at a much greater risk of serious pathology and require an extremely thorough assessment before (if ever) discharging with a rule-out diagnosis e.g constipation, gastro, abdo pain NYD etc.

 

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RCP – Gravidology for the Emergency Physician

Gravidology for the Emergency Physician

Resident Clinical Pearl – April 2017

Luke Taylor, PGY1 iFMEM, Dalhousie University, Saint John, New Brunswick

Reviewed by Dr. David Lewis

 

 

Many adaptations take place in the gravid female, the end goal of each being to provide optimal growth for the fetus, as well as to protect the mother from the potential risks of labour and delivery. It is very important to understand these changes when assessing an unwell pregnant patient in the ED.


Vital Signs:

 

BP: Blood pressure falls earlier in pregnancy with nadir in second trimester (mean ~105/60 mmHg). In the third trimester BP increases and may reach pre pregnancy levels at term. BP is related to a reduction in SVR and multiple hormonal influences that are not fully understood.

 

HR: CO=HRxSV. The increase in CO is attributed mainly to the increase in circulating volume (30-50% above baseline). HR increases by 15-20 beats/min over non pregnant females.

*Supine position in the gravid female can lower CO by 20-30% due to a reduction in venous return which reduces stroke volume.

 

RR: State of relative hyperventilation. NO change in RR, however there is an increase in tidal volume resulting in a 50% increase in minute ventilation. Increased O2 consumption and demand with hypersensitivity to chances in CO2.

*60-70% of women experience a sensation of dyspnea during pregnancy

 

 


Diagnostic Imaging and ECG:

 

Must ensure imaging is necessary for management and explain risks well.

** 1 rad increases the risk of childhood malignancy by 1.5-2x above baseline.

 

CXR: Minimal changes to CXR in normal pregnancy but may have; prominence of the pulmonary vasculature and elevation of the diaphragm.

 

PoCUS: FAST doesn’t perform well in pregnant patient. Small amount of physiologic free fluid in the pelvis (posterior, lower portion of uterus), all else should be considered pathologic. Physiologic hydronephrosis and hydroureter (mostly R-sided).

 

CT-A: When required to r/o PE, capable of being completed at very low rad (below teratogen cut off, CT of 1-3rad is under the teratogenic cutoff of 5-10rad = 10,000 cxr or 10x CT chest

 

ECG: Various changes occur, may include ST and T wave changes, and presence of Q waves. The heart is rotated toward the left, resulting in a 15 to 20º left axis deviation. Marked variation in chamber volumes, especially left atrial enlargement. This can lead to stretching of the cardiac conduction pathways and predisposes to alterations in cardiac rhythm.

 

 


Routine Laboratory Tests:

 

CBC: Physiologic Anemia – Increased retention of Na and H2O (6-8L) leading to volume expansion combined with a slightly smaller increase in red cell mass.

Leukocytosis – Due to physiologic stress from the pregnancy itself, creates a new reference range from 9000, to as high as 25000 in healthy pregnant females (often predominately neutrophils)

 

PTT: Various processes result in 20% reduction of PTT and a hypercoagulable state (also helps to protect from hemorrhage during labour).

 

Urinalysis: Very common to have 1-3+ leukocytes, presence of blood, as well as ketones on point of care testing. Not considered pathologic unless Nitrite positive.

 

Creatinine: Pre-eclamptic patients may have a creatinine in the normal range, but have a drastic reduction in GFR (40%).

 

B-HCG: Every female of childbearing years should be considered to: Be pregnant, RH-, and have an ectopic until proven otherwise. Draw a beta HCG on every critically ill or injured women of childbearing years regardless of reported LMP.

 


ACLS:

 

Remember, most features are the same as when resuscitating a non-pregnant patient.

Some things to remember:

 

Higher risk of aspiration – Progesterone relaxes gastroesophageal sphincters and prolongs transit times throughout the intestinal tract. = Careful bag mask ventilation, do not overdo it.

Left uterine displacement (LUD)– While patient supine to provide best chest compressions possible

Medications and Dosages– Remain the same in pregnancy, vasopressors like epinephrine should still be used despite effect on uterus perfusion

Defibrillation OK-  Fetus is not effected by defibrillation, low risk of arc if fetal monitors in place, do not delay.

Four minute rule– For patients whose uterus is at or above the umbilicus, prepare for cesarean delivery if no ROSC by 4mins. ** In a case series of 38 perimortem cesarean delivery (PMCDs), 12 of 20 women for whom maternal outcome was recorded had ROSC immediately after delivery.

Etiology:  Must continue to think broadly, however common reasons for maternal cardiac arrest are: bleeding, heart failure, amniotic fluid embolism (AFE), and sepsis. Common maternal conditions that can lead to cardiac arrest are: preeclampsia/eclampsia, cerebrovascular events, complications from anesthesia, and thrombosis/thromboembolism.

 


REFERENCES

Cardiac Arrest in Pregnancy – A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

Up To Date – Respiratory Tract Changes in Pregnancy

Merk Manual – Physiology of Preganacy

https://radiopaedia.org/cases/chest-x-ray-in-normal-pregnancy

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SHoC blog from @CanadiEM

Social media site @CanadiEM recently featured the @CJEMonline @IFEM2 #SHoC Consensus Protocol, featuring authors from @SJRHEM among others.

So why do we need another ultrasound protocol in emergency medicine? RUSHing from the original FAST scan, playing the ACES, FOCUSing on the CAUSE and meeting our FATE, it may seem SHoCking that many of these scanning protocols are not based on disease incidence or data on their impact, but rather on expert opinion. The Sonography in Hypotension (SHoC) protocols were developed by an international group of critical care and emergency physicians, using a Delphi consensus process, based upon the actual incidence of sonographic pathology detected in previously published international prospective studies [Milne; Gaspari]. The protocols are formulated to help the clinician utilize ultrasound to confirm or exclude common causes, and guides them to consider core, supplementary and additional views, depending upon the likely cause specific to the case.

Why would I take the time to scan the aorta of a 22 year old female with hypotension, when looking for pelvic free fluid might be more appropriate? Why would I not look for lung sliding, or B lines in a breathless shocked patient? Consideration of the shock category by addressing the “4 Fs” (fluid, form, function, and filling) will provide a sense of the best initial therapy and should help guide other investigations. Differentiating cardiogenic shock (a poorly contracting, enlarged heart, widespread lung B lines, and an engorged IVC) in an elderly hypotensive breathless patient, from sepsis (a vigorously contracting, normally sized or small heart, focal or no B lines, and an empty IVC) will change the initial resuscitation plan dramatically. Differentiating cardiac tamponade from tension pneumothorax in apparent obstructive shock or cardiac arrest will lead to dramatically differing interventions.

SHoC guides the clinician towards the more likely positive findings found in hypotensive patients and during cardiac arrest, while providing flexibility to tailor other windows to the questions the clinician needs to answer. One side does not fit all. That is hardly SHoCing news. Prospective validation of ultrasound protocols is necessary, and I look forward to future analysis of the effectiveness of these protocols.

References

Scalea TM, Rodriguez A, Chiu WC, et al. Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST): results from an inter- national consensus conference. J Trauma 1999;46:466-72.

Labovitz AJ, Noble VE, Bierig M, Goldstein SA, Jones R, Kort S, Porter TR, Spencer KT, Tayal VS, Wei K. Focused cardiac ultrasound in the emergent setting: a consensus statement of the American Society of Echocardiography and American College of Emergency Physicians. Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography. 2010 Dec 31;23(12):1225-30.

Hernandez C, Shuler K, Hannan H, Sonyika C, Likourezos A, Marshall J. C.A.U.S.E.: cardiac arrest ultra-sound exam – a better approach to managing patients in primary non-arrhythmogenic cardiac arrest. Resuscitation 2008;76:198–206

Atkinson PR, McAuley DJ, Kendall RJ, et al. Abdominal and Cardiac Evaluation with Sonography in Shock (ACES): an approach by emergency physicians for the use of ultrasound in patients with undifferentiated hypotension. Emerg Med J 2009;26:87–91

Perera P, Mailhot T, Riley D, Mandavia D. The RUSH exam: Rapid Ultrasound in Shock in the evaluation of the critically lll. Emerg Med Clin North Am 2010;28:29 – 56

Jensen MB, Sloth E, Larsen KM, Schmidt MB: Transthoracic echocardiography for cardiopulmonary monitoring in intensive care. Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2004, 21: 700-707.

Gaspari R, Weekes A, Adhikari S, Noble VE, Nomura JT, Theodoro D, Woo M, Atkinson P, Blehar D, Brown SM, Caffery T. Emergency department point-of-care ultrasound in out-of-hospital and in-ED cardiac arrest. Resuscitation. 2016 Dec 31;109:33-9.

Milne J, Atkinson P, Lewis D, et al. (April 08, 2016) Sonography in Hypotension and Cardiac Arrest (SHoC): Rates of Abnormal Findings in Undifferentiated Hypotension and During Cardiac Arrest as a Basis for Consensus on a Hierarchical Point of Care Ultrasound Protocol. Cureus 8(4): e564. doi:10.7759/cureus.564

Sonography in Hypotension and Cardiac Arrest: The SHoC Consensus Statement

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CAEP Definition of an Emergency Physician and the Importance of Emergency Medicine Certification

CAEP Definition of an Emergency Physician

An emergency physician is a physician who is engaged in the practice of emergency medicine and demonstrates the specific set of required competencies that define this field of medical practice. The accepted route to demonstration of competence in medicine in Canada is through certification by a recognized certifying body.*

CAEP recognizes that historically many of its members are physicians who have practiced emergency medicine without formal training and certification. Many have been, and continue to be key contributors to developing emergency medicine and staffing emergency departments in Canada. CAEP acknowledges the contributions of these valued physicians and recognizes them as emergency physicians. It is CAEP’s vision going forward that physicians entering emergency practise will demonstrate their competencies by obtaining certification.

* Recognized certifying bodies in Canada are:
The Royal College of Physicians & Surgeons of Canada
The College of Family Physicians of Canada
(Emergency Physicians with equivalent non-Canadian training and certification are also recognized in Canada eg The American Board of Emergency Medicine)

CAEP Statement on the Importance of Emergency Medicine Certification in Canada

It is CAEP’s vision, that by 2020 all emergency physicians in Canada will be certified in emergency medicine by a recognized certifying body.*

Toward that vision, provincial governments and Faculties of Medicine must urgently allocate resources to increase the numbers of emergency medicine postgraduate positions in recognized training programs so the Colleges are able to address the gap in human resources and training. Furthermore, physicians who have historically practiced emergency medicine without certification must be supported in their efforts to become certified. CAEP is committed to facilitate this process by cataloguing and nationally coordinating practice- and practitioner-friendly educational continuing professional development programs designed to assist non-certified physicians to be successful in their efforts.

* Recognized certifying bodies in Canada are:
The Royal College of Physicians & Surgeons of Canada
The College of Family Physicians of Canada
(Emergency physicians with equivalent non-Canadian training and certification are also recognized in Canada eg The American Board of Emergency Medicine)

We have also published on this topic, highlighting the need for more resident positions in New Brunswick and PEI. Read our paper here.

 

Read more from CAEP here.

 

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ED Rounds – How Big Are Your Stones

‘How big are your stones….David?’

A Renal Colic Presentation by Brian Ramrattan

 


 


 

 


 

Passing a Stone?

  • <5mm likely to pass without intervention
  • >10mm unlikely to pass without intervention
  • Increased intervention requirements with larger stones
  • Likelihood of stone passing also affected by position
    • Stones at the vesicoureteric junction more likely to be passed than those in the proximal ureter

 


 

Download (PDF, 6.16MB)

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ED Rounds – Early Pregnancy

Pregnancy of Unknown Location & Early Pregnancy Loss

Presented by: Dr Robin Clouston

 


 

  • Ruling out ectopic pregnancy is a critical issue in evaluation of the symptomatic patient in early pregnancy
  • In women presenting to ED with abdominal pain or pv bleeding, prevalence of ectopic as high as 13%
  • Well known sequelae of missed ectopic
    • Rupture, tubal infertility, possible death
  • Sequelae of false positive diagnosis of ectopic
    • Termination of viable, desired pregnancy

 


Sonographic findings in Ectopic

  • Adnexal mass
    • Simple adnexal cyst – low probability ectopic if < 3mm (5%)
    • Complex adnexal mass – high probability ectopic (90%)
    • Most common location: ampullary or isthmic portion of fallopian tube (95% of ectopics)
  • Isolated free fluid in the pelvis
    • Rarely the only sonographic finding
  • Pseudogestational sac – seen in at most 10% ectopic
  • Normal scan – 15 to 25%

Utility of US with low βHCG

  • ACEP recommends:

“Proceed to transvaginal ultrasonogaphy in symptomatic patients with βHCG less than 1000.”

  • Comprehensive transvaginal ultrasonography has a moderate sensitivity to detect IUP with βHCG < 1000
    • 40 to 67% sensitive
  • For patients whose final diagnosis is ectopic:
    • When βHCG < 1000, TVUS had 86 to 92% sensitivity to detect findings suggestive of ectopic

Safety of Discharge

  • NJEM 2013:3
    • there is limited risk in taking a few extra days to make a definitive diagnosis in a woman with a pregnancy of unknown location who has no signs or symptoms of rupture and no ultrasonographic evidence of ectopic pregnancy.
  • Progression of hCG values over a period of 48 hours provides valuable information:13
    • If failure to fall by 15%
    • And failure to rise by 55%
    • …most likely diagnosis is ectopic pregnancy

Morin L et al. Ultrasound Evaluation of First Trimester Complications of Pregnancy. J Obstet Gynaecol Can 2016;38(10):982-988

 

 


 

A reasonable approach

In the pregnant patient with vaginal bleeding and / or abdominal pain:

  • Always perform bedside US to establish ?definitive IUP
  • Do not rule out ectopic pregnancy in patients with empty uterus and βHCG < 1000
  • Do obtain a comprehensive TVUS when bedside US does not confirm IUP regardless of βHCG

In the pregnant patient with vaginal bleeding and / or abdominal pain:

  • When TVUS is delayed or remains non-diagnostic, involve obstetrician to aid in risk stratification and management
  • Reliable, hemodynamically stable patients may be discharged with follow up
  • Expedited TVUS (next day)
  • Repeat βHCG in 48h

 


 

Take Home Points

  • Do obtain a comprehensive TVUS when bedside US does not confirm IUP regardless of βHCG
  • Do not rule out ectopic pregnancy in patients with empty uterus and βHCG < 1000
    • Clinical judgment: safe discharge planning vs admission
    • Low threshold to involve Obs-Gyn for these cases
  • Early pregnancy loss is diagnosed by US when:
    • CRL >/= 7mm with no FRH
    • Mean sac diameter >/= 25mm and no embryo
  • Expectant, medical and surgical management are equally effective and safe in treatment of EPL
    • Patient preference may guide decision making

Download (PDF, 1.92MB)

 


Download (PDF, 4.05MB)

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EM Reflections – April 2017

Thanks to Dr. Joanna Middleton for her summary

Edited by Dr David Lewis

 

Top tips from this month’s rounds:


Syncopal/Pre-Syncopal Episode – Usually benign, but sometimes serious…….

Red flag symptoms of potentially life-threatening causes of syncope are syncope with exercise, chest pain, dyspnea, severe headachepalpitations, back pain, hematemesis / melena before the syncopal episode. Palpitations before loss of consciousness are a significant predictor of a cardiac cause of syncope. Focal neurologic deficits, diplopia, ataxia, or dysarthria after the syncopal episode.

 

2017 ACC/AHA/HRS Guideline for the Evaluation and Management of Patients With Syncope: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines, and the Heart Rhythm Society


Syncope Risk Scores

San Francisco Syncope Rule

Canadian Syncope Risk Score


ECG in Syncope

CanadiEM – Medical Concept – ECGs in Syncope

Download (PDF, 2.02MB)

 


Subarachnoid hemorrhage can present with syncope…

  • 97% – sudden, severe headache – “worst”
  • 53% – syncope
  • 77% – N/V
  • 35% – meningismus

How To Be A Clinical Rock Star Managing Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

 


 

Abdominal Aorta – Aneurysm vs Dissection

Only 2% of all aortic dissections originate from abdominal aorta. Almost all aortic dissections originate in the thoracic aorta.

The majority of abdominal aortic aneurysms are infrarenal

AAA – A comprehensive review

Download (PDF, 516KB)

 


Management of the Unruptured AAA

  • Symptomatic or asymptomatic
  • How can an unruptured AAA be symptomatic???
    • (rapid expansion of the aortic wall, ischemia from blocking off blood vessels, compression of other structures etc)
  • Symptomatic – admit for repair, regardless aneurysm diameter
  • Asymptomatic
    • <5.5cm – likely outpatient
    • “Very large aneurysm” (>6cm) – likely admit for repair

 

Transfers to and from Major Emergency Departments

  • Emergency transfers from referring sites for diagnostic imaging are potentially high risk
  • Adverse events have been reported in the medical literature for this group of patients
  • A detailed handover between referral and receiving site will reduce risk
  • Patient stability must be assessed prior to transfer, on arrival at receiving site and prior to return to referral site.
  • The results of the diagnostic imaging should be taken into context with the patient’s condition prior to release for return to referral site.

Download (PDF, 293KB)

 


 

Hyponatremia – How low is too low?

 

  • All patients with severe (< 120)
  • Any patient that is symptomatic from the hyponatremia

LIFL – Hyponatremia – Diagnosis and Management

 

For the budding critical care physiologist – Deranged Physiology – Hyponatremia

 

 

 

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EM Reflections – March 2017

Thanks to Dr Paul Page for his summary

Edited by Dr David Lewis

Top tips from this month’s rounds:

 


Vertebral Artery Dissection – a tricky diagnosis and potentially catastrophic if missed…

 

Consider dissection in vertigo patients even without history of significant or mild trauma.

Headache and/or neck pain followed by vertigo or unilateral facial paresthesia is an important warning sign that may precede onset of stroke by several days. Dizziness, vertigo, double vision, ataxia, and dysarthria are common clinical features. Lateral medullary (Wallenberg syndrome) and cerebellar infarctions are the most common types of strokes.

Diagnosis – CT Angiography

Treatment – Antiplatelet or Anticoagulation (unless contraindications – see article below)

Cervical Artery Dissection in Stroke Study (CADISS) trial, RCT – antiplatelets versus anticoagulants in the treatment of extracranial carotid and vertebral artery dissections (VADs) = no difference found in outcomes between groups receiving antiplatelets vs anticoagulants. CADISS

Vertebral Artery Dissection: Natural History, Clinical Features and Therapeutic Considerations – (full text)

Rounds Presentation by Dr Kavish Chandra (R2 iFMEM)

Download (PDF, 755KB)


 

Limping Kids – inability to weight bear is always significant…

Need for thorough investigation of non traumatic hip pain in child unable to weight bear. Don’t get biased with previous diagnosis even if by specialists.

Don’t miss – Septic Arthritis or SCFE


From – Orthobullets.com – Hip Septic Arthritis – Pediatric – Author:

See this SJRHEM ED Rounds on Limping Kids

Take home pearls:

  • A limping/NWB child that can crawl is likely to have pathology below the knee
  • Examine least likely source of symptoms first.
  • Flex, Adduct and Int Rot hip most likely manoeuvre to elicit pain in hip pathology
  • Children >8yrs – X-ray hip first
  • If fever (>38°) or > 24hrs then bloods (incl CRP)
  • CRP < 12 is very reassuring (and a high CRP mandates further Ix to rule out septic arthritis)
  • Positive ultrasound is most likely to be irritable hip
  • Negative ultrasound – X-ray leg

 

 

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NB Trauma – ATLS Course – April 21-23, 2017 – last few places remaining…!

The Advanced Trauma Life Support® (ATLS®) program can teach you a systematic, concise approach to the care of a trauma patient. ATLS was developed by the American College of Surgeons (ACS) Committee on Trauma (COT) and was first introduced in the US and abroad in 1980.  Its courses provide you with a safe and reliable method for immediate management of injured patients.  The course teaches you how to assess a patient’s condition, resuscitate and stabilize him or her, and determine if his or her needs exceed a facility’s capacity. Inter hospital transfer and assurance of optimal patient care during transfer is also covered.  An ATLS course provides an easy method to remember for evaluation and treatment of a trauma victim.

 

 

The NB Trauma Program invites physicians to register for this 2 ½ day course that provides physicians with a measurable, comprehensive and reproducible system of trauma assessment and critical interventions for the patient with multiple injuries.

 

Enrollment is limited and registration is first-come, first-served basis, upon receipt of full payment. A one-day Refresher course is also being offered (on Sunday) and starts at 8:00am.  These courses will be conducted in English.

 

Location:       Saint John Regional Hospital

 

Dates:

April 21, 2017              4:00pm – 9:30pm

April 22, 2017              8:00am – 6:30pm

April 23, 2017              8:00am – 3:30pm

 

Questions?    Please contact Lisa at (506) 648-5056 or Lisa.Miller-Snow@HorizonNB.ca

 


 

Download (PDF, 1.07MB)

 


Application Form:

 

Download (PDF, 243KB)

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ED Rounds – Delirium in the ED

Delirium in the ED: How can we help?

Presented by: Dr Cherie-Lee Adams

 


Incidence of Delirium

  • 40% admitted patients >65yo
  • 10-20% on admission
  • 5-10% more during admission

Increased Risk of Delirium:

  • Male
  • >60yo, more prevalent >80yo
  • Hearing/visual impairment
  • Dementia
  • Depression
  • Functional dependence
  • Polypharmacy
  • Major medical/surgical illness


DSM-V Criteria

  • A) Disturbance in attention and awareness
  • B) Disturbance is ACUTE
  • C) Concurrent cognitive impairment
  • D) Not evolving dementia, nor coma
  • E) Can be explained by Hx/Px/Ix

 


 

Non – Pharmacological Approach

  • Nutritional support
  • Optimize hearing/sight
  • Maximize day/night/date/time cues
  • Minimize pain
  • Rehabilitate- ambulate, encourage self-care
  • Avoid restraints

Pharmacological Options

  • Treat only if distress/agitated/safety concern
      • don’t treat hypoactive delirium, wandering, or prophylactically
  • monotherapy
  • low dose
  • short course
  • Benzos- reserve for withdrawal
  • APs
        • Haldol 0.25-0.5mg
        • risperidone 0.25mg od-bid
        • olanzapine 1.25-2.5mg/d
        • quetiapine 12.5-50mg/d

 

Take Home Points

  • Delirium is common, esp in elderly
  • Significant morbidity/mortality associated
  • Brief screening with DTS/bCAM works
  • Intervention focus on limiting pathology, normalizing activities, minimizing drugs
  • Low dose APs for short period for agitation

 


 

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ED Rounds – Compassion Fatigue and Burnout – Dr Jenn Hannigan

Preventing Compassion Fatigue and Burnout

Presented by: Dr Jenn Hannigan MD CCFP(PM)

 

The practice of medicine is:

an art, not a trade;

a calling not a business;

a calling in which your heart will be exercised equally with your head.

-Sir William Osler


Compassion Fatigue:

  • “the cost of caring”
  • Secondary or vicarious traumatization
  • Symptoms parallel to PTSD
    • Hyperarousal (poor sleep, irritability)
    • Avoidance (“not wanting to go there”)
    • Re-experiencing (intrusive thoughts/dreams when triggered)

Burnout:

  • Emotional exhaustion
  • Reduced personal accomplishment and commitment to the profession
  • Depersonalization
    • A negative attitude towards patients
    • Personal detachment
    • Loss of ideals

 

How can we mitigate burnout:

  • Mindfulness Meditation
  • Reflective Writing
  • Adequate supervision and mentoring
  • Sustainable workload
  • Promotion of feelings of choice and control
  • Appropriate recognition and reward
  • Supportive work community
  • Promotion of fairness and justice in the workplace

 

Between stimulus and response there is a space.

In that space is our power to choose our response.

In our response lies our growth and our freedom.

  -Viktor Frankl


 

 


Getting Started with Meditation:

 


 

Download (PDF, 1.02MB)

 

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ED Rounds – Sickle Cell Anemia

Sickle Cell Disease

Presented by: Dr Paul Vanhoutte

 

As we welcome new families to New Brunswick from the Middle East and Africa, we are likely to see an increased incidence of sickle cell emergencies.  Needs assessments in Canada have shown that Emergencies Physicians outside of the major urban centres lack experience and knowledge in dealing with this disease.

 

 

Global distribution of the sickle cell gene – from: http://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms1104

Emergency Presentations

  • Acute painful episodes
  • Acute anemic crisis
  • Acute aplastic crisis
  • Acute chest syndrome
  • Infection
  • Splenic sequestration
  • Cerebrovascular events
  • Avascular necrosis
  • Renal complications
  • Hepatobiliary complications
  • Ophthalmic complications
  • Priapism

 

A recent article and podcast in EM Cases provides a great outline on  – Emergency Management of Sickle Cell Disease

 

Take Home Points

  • Treat sickle – acute painful episodes with opiate analgesia.
  • Normal vital signs do not exclude sickle – acute painful crisis.
  • High index of suspicion for associated sepsis ( meningitis, septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, pneumonia, pyelonephritis)especially if they have a fever
  • Check renal function before prescribing NSAIDS
  • Supplemental Oxygen only if hypoxic (<92%)
  • IV fluids only required if hypotensive/ hypovolemic

 

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