Trauma Reflections – October 2018

Thanks to Dr. Andrew Lohoar and Sue Benjamin for leading the discussions this month

 


Major points of interest:

 

A)  Intubated patients should not need restraints..

Post intubation sedation and analgesia can be challenging. Key is to avoid starting medications that could potentially drop blood pressure at very high infusion rates, but we need sedation and analgesia promptly.

Consider bolus of sedatives and analgesics prior to initiating infusions and prn boluses afterwards. Inadequate analgesia is often the cause of continued agitation.

 

B)   But what about this guy with the BP of low / really low?

Consider “vitamin K” – ketamine – can augment BP in patients who are not catecholamine depleted.

 

C)  Trauma patients you know will require consultants

When services are known to be required for patients prior to arrival (intubated, critical ortho injuries, penetrating trauma, transfers etc.) call a level A activation – consultants should meet patient with you. Give the consultants notice when patient is 15 minutes out.

Required consultants need to attend to critically injured in a timely fashion. Escalate to department head or chief of staff if there is unreasonable delay.

View the SJRHEM Trauma Page for list of definitions including Trauma Team, Activation Levels etc

 

E) Managing the pediatric airway – adrenalizing for all involved

Pediatric trauma is the pinnacle of a HALF (high acuity, low frequency) event. Team approach is key. Get out the Broselow tape.

Bradycardia with intubation attempts is not infrequent in youngest patients. Consider atropine as pre-med if  < 1 year of age or < 5 years of age and using succinylcholine.

 

F) MTP

Do not forget platelets and plasma if onto 4th unit of PRBCs – 4:1:1 ratio.

 

G)  Where is this patient being admitted?

Not to the hospitalist service, that is where!

Patients with significant injuries, but not needing immediate surgical intervention, should be admitted/observed in ICE x 24 hrs. Department head and/or chief of staff are available to assist if needed.

 

H)  Chest tube types and sizes

Pigtail catheters for traumatic pneumothorax are effective, less painful and are gaining favour as an alternative to traditional chest tubes. As for sizes, there is likely little benefit for 36F over 32 F catheters – probably time to retire these monsters from the chest tube cart.

I)     Why do bedside U/S if patient about to go to CT?

Chest scan might prompt chest tube placement prior to CT if pneumothorax is identified. Although identifying blood in the abdomen prior to CT may not change your management – it may prompt an earlier call to general surgery.

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EM Reflections – September 2018

Thanks to Dr. Joanna Middleton for leading the discussions this month

Edited by Dr David Lewis 

 

 


 

Top tips from this month’s rounds:

 

Pediatric Head Injury

Clonazepam Toxicity

Pediatric(< 3 months)Fever

Wide Complex Tachycardia

 


Pediatric Head Injury

  • What are the criteria for CT Head?

In a recent Lancet article (2017),  PECARN, CATCH and CHALICE were compared.

The highest point validation sensitivities were shown for PECARN in children younger than 2 years (100·0%, 95% CI 90·7–100·0; 38 patients identified of 38 with outcome [38/38]) and PECARN in children 2 years and older (99·0%, 94·4–100·0; 97/98)

  • How do I use PECARN?


 

A useful review by EM Cases can be accessed here. In an update to this review they have noted recent new evidence that isolated vomiting without any other positive rule predictors may warrant observation only:

Update 2018:  A secondary analysis of the Australasian Paediatric Head Injury Rule Study demonstrated head injury with isolated vomiting (i.e. vomiting without any of clinical decision rule predictors) was uncommonly associated with TBI on CT, or the presence of clinically important TBI.  This study suggests a strategy of observation without head CT may be appropriate management.  Abstract

Vomiting alone should not instigate CT.  Risk goes up with any other Head Injury symptoms (Headache etc). These children should be observed until they are able to tolerate oral intake and the treating clinician feels comfortable that the patient is stable without additional symptoms of head injury.

This article discusses linear skull fractures. It reminds us to always consider Non-Accidental Injury in all cases of pediatric head injury, especially in the pre-mobile age group.

PoCUS may have a role to play in fine tuning risk stratification and a recent study (2018) has further evaluated diagnostic accuracy:

We enrolled a convenience sample of 115 of 151 (76.1%) eligible patients. Of the 115 enrolled, 88 (76.5%) had skull fractures. POCUS had a sensitivity of 80 of 88 (90.9%; 95% CI 82.9-96.0) and a specificity of 23 of 27 (85.2%; 95% CI 66.3-95.8) for identifying skull fractures.

  • If I don’t perform a CT, then how long should a child with a head injury be observed?

There is no definite evidence-based answer to this question. However this study suggest that 6 hrs is probably safe.

Key Points

  1. Always use a clinical decision rule to determine whether a child with head injury requires CT, Observation or can be safely discharged
  2. When using a decision rule utilize a ‘shared decision-making’ philosophy – i.e involve the parents/carers
  3. A period of observation can reduce the number of CTs performed.
  4. If observation is recommended, then allow 6hrs.
  5. Always consider non-accidental injury during your assessment of pediatric head injury.

 

 


 

Clonazepam Toxicity

  • Overdosage of clonazepam may produce somnolence, confusion, ataxia, diminished reflexes, or coma
  • Clonazepam is extensively metabolized in the liver to several metabolites
  • Clonazepam is rapidly and well absorbed from the GI tract
  • Peak blood concentrations are reached in 2 -4 hours
  • Elimination half-life … 18.7 to 39 hr

Full ToxNet entry

Treatment

Treatment is entirely supportive with IV access and fluids and maintenance of the airway and ventilation if required

Oral activated charcoal is of little value in pure benzodiazepine poisoning. It may be given to patients who have recently ingested benzodiazepines with other drugs that may benefit from decontamination

Flumazenil is rarely indicated except for iatrogenic oversedation or respiratory depression. In addition, flumazenil may cause withdrawal states and result in seizures, adrenergic stimulation, or autonomic instability in patients chronically taking benzodiazepine, or in those with ventricular dysrhythmias and seizures who are concomitantly using cocaine or tricyclic antidepressants.

Dispostion

All patients with intentional ingestion or significant ataxia, drowsiness, or respiratory depression should be observed.

Patients with severe symptoms (ie, coma, respiratory failure, or hypotension unresponsive to IV fluids) should be consulted to ICU.

Given the prolonged half-life patients strongly consider admitting patients who present with significant drowsiness or are known to have taken a large overdose.

Patients with a significant sedative drug overdose should be advised not to drive until potential interference with psychomotor performance has resolved. For significant benzodiazepine overdose, this is at least 24 hours after discharge.

Key Points

  1. Clonazepam overdose is treated with supportive measures.
  2. Clonazepam has a very long half-life. For significant drowsiness, admission should be considered to avoid potentially very long ED observation periods.

 


Pediatric (< 3 months) Fever

The management of fever in infants less than 1 month is relatively straightforward. Guidelines are generally consistent (Merck,

  • Full blood lab work-up (CBC, CRP, Cultures)
  • Urine culture
  • CXR
  • RSV, Flu nasal swabs
  • LP
  • Empiric IV Antibiotics (e.g Ampicillin 50mg/kg and Cefotaxime 50mg/kg)
  • Consult Pediatrics and Admit

Emergency Medicine Cases article can be viewed here – Episode 48 – Pediatric Fever Without A Source

*********

For infants older than 30 days and younger than 3 months the guidelines are variable:

ALiEM: Paucis Verbis: Fever without a source (29 days-3 months old)

NICE Guidelines (UK):  Fever in under 5s: assessment and initial management

MD Calc – Step-by-Step Approach Calculator 

Suggested Emergency Department Approach

  • If Sick-Appearing treat as <3 months (see above)
  • If Well- Appearing (age normal vitals):
    • Full blood lab work-up (CBC, CRP, Cultures)
    • Urine culture
    • Consider CXR
    • Consult Pediatrics (Depending on results of above will either need admission +/- antibiotics or 24hr follow-up)

Yukon Guidelines


 

Wide Complex Tachycardia

Differential Diagnosis (note: repetition is deliberate!)

  • Ventricular Tachycardia
  • Ventricular Tachycardia
  • Ventricular Tachycardia
  • SVT with aberrant conduction – lots of causes
    • Pre-existing/rate-related BBB
    • Ventricular pre-excitation (AVNRT/AVRT)
    • Dysfunction of IV conduction system (toxic, metabolic, infectious, drug related etc) – hyper K, sodium channel blockers

No ‘rule’ is specific enough to correctly identify, so treat like VT

Treatment 

  • Unstable?
    • ANY sign of end-organ dysfunction – hypotension, altered LOC, CHF/SOB, CP, diaphoretic etc
    • SHOCK
  • Stable?
    • Shock or medical management
    • Amiodarone vs procainamide, ?adenosine (see below)

Adenosine/vagal – consider in patients where uncertain of diagnosis, unlikely to be VT, no hx of CAD, young, hx of SVT

Adenosine with WPW – ContraIndicated – may induce AV block and accelerate conduction of atrial fibrillatory impulses through the bypass tract, which can lead to very rapid ventricular arrhythmias that degenerate to VF.

“Avoidance of IV beta blockers, calcium channel blockers and digoxin due to the potential for hemodynamic deterioration in patients with stable WCT, potentially resulting in hypotension, VF and cardiac arrest”. (Uptodate)

Verapamil and diltiazem are calcium channel blockers (CCBs) that should be avoided in WCTs, as cardiac arrests from hemodynamic collapse have been reported following their administration.  Not only do these agents cause negative inotropy and at times profound vasodilation, but they may also allow WCTs to degenerate into VFIB

Caveat – RRWCT (Regular Really Wide Complex Tachy)

  • One situation where you may not want to assume VT….
  • What question should you ask?
    • What is the K,
    • what is the OD?
  • Really, really wide complex tachycardia – >200 mseconds – consider tox or metabolic – try bicarb or calcium – if it narrows – not VTach.
  • Avoid procainamide and amiodarone in these patients.

 

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Trauma Reflections – August 2018

Thanks to Dr. Andrew Lohoar and Sue Benjamin for leading the discussions this month

 


 

Major points of interest:

 

A) Blood is important stuff…so keep track of it.

Recent ATLS guidelines are suggesting switching to blood for resuscitation after one litre crystalloid bolus, not two. We will be using blood more often and it is important to keep track of amount ordered and infused. Give clear orders, document, and send any unused units back to transfusion medicine.

 

B) Analgesia/anti-emetics prior to leaving for diagnostic imaging

Moving on/off DI tables can increase pain or provoke nausea in some patients.

 

C) Who put that thing there?

If you decide to put something into your patient, such as a chest tube or ET tube, then write a procedure note, including details of placement confirmation.

 

D) Trauma patients you know will require consultants

When services are known to be required for patients prior to arrival (intubated, critical ortho injuries, penetrating trauma, transfers etc.) call a level A activation – consultants should meet patient with you. Give the consultants notice when patient is 15 minutes out.

In pediatric traumas that cannot be managed locally use the NB Trauma TCP to coordinate transfers to IWK.

 

E) Yo-yoing to DI for yet another film

“Pan-scanning” a younger patient can be a difficult decision, but if there is a high energy MOI and indication for spine imaging, CT scan is the superior imaging choice.

 

F) Pregnancy tests for everybody

Do not forget this in ‘older’ pediatric age group.

 

G) “Moving all limbs”..

..is NOT an acceptable documentation of exam findings in a patient with suspected neurologic injury. Thorough exam to detect any deficits is needed for neurologic baseline and for comparison later. Dermatome level of sensory dysfunction, key muscle group strength (0-5 scale) and anal sphincter tone should all be recorded, with time of exam.

 

H) Severe traumatic brain injury

Remember the CRASH 3 study – adult with TBI < 3hrs from time of injury.

 

I) Motorcycle + cocaine + EtOH + no helmet…

Equals an agitated head injured patient very difficult to sedate after intubation. Consider fentanyl infusion in addition to sedation infusion.

 

 

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Trauma Reflections – June 2018

Thanks to Dr. Andrew Lohoar and Sue Benjamin for leading the discussions this month

 


 

Major points of interest:

 

A)  Should that be bubbling like that?

Chest tube placement is a critical procedure in managing trauma patients – successful placement can be challenging, complications are common. Post-procedural imaging and check of chest drain system should determine adequate positioning/effectiveness. Check for fluctuation (tidaling) of fluid level in water seal chamber.

 

B)   Nice intubation…but why is his BP now70?

Post intubation sedation and analgesia infusions are superior to push dosing, but should be titrated up slowly to effect. Avoid starting medications that could potentially drop blood pressure at very high infusion rates – yo-yoing BP is not good for damaged neurons.

See attached NB consensus statement for suggested medications and dosages.

FINAL Consensus statement – RSI+ – July 2018

C)  Crystalloid choice in burns

(Warmed) Ringer’s lactate is the preferred crystalloid for initial management of burns patients. And probably all trauma patients for that matter.

 

D)  TTA log sheets – numbers are only slightly better

Ensure qualifying traumas have activations, and TTA log sheets are filled out. Don’t forget transfers should have activations as well.

When services are known to be required for transfer patients (intubated, critical ortho injuries etc.) call a level A activation – consultants should meet patient with you.

Remember, ED length of stay < 4hours is significantly higher with trauma activations (60% vs. 30%), so it is to our advantage to identify these patients immediately on arrival.

 

E) Propofol infusions in pediatric population

This in still a no-no in patients < 18 yo. Single doses for procedure is fine, but for maintaining sedation choose something else.

 

F)  “Moving all limbs”..

..is NOT an acceptable documentation of exam findings in a patient with suspected neurologic injury. Thorough exam to detect any deficits is needed for neurologic baseline and for comparison later. Dermatome level of sensory dysfunction, key muscle group strength (0-5 scale) and anal sphincter tone should all be recorded, with time of exam.

 

G)  We don’t talk anymore..

There should be TTL to TTL handover at shift change if the trauma patient still resides in our ED. Even if consultants are involved.

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Trauma Reflections – April 2018

Thanks to Dr. Andrew Lohoar and Sue Benjamin for leading the discussions this month

 


 

Major points of interest:

 

A) Managing airway in severely head injured patient

Intubate GCS < 5 prior to CT scan or after? Good discussion ensued. The bottom line – with a well-placed i-gel LMA and spontaneous respirations with O2 sats of 99%, obtaining CT to rule out potentially correctable brain injury is the priority. Intubation on return to ED from DI should be done using appropriate techniques and medications to minimize surge in ICP – SEE THIS PODCAST

 

B) He is on Riveroxaban? That’s just great..

Trauma patient on NOAC/DOAC can be a challenge. Only medication with true reversal agent is dabigatran (Praxbind 5G IV). Consider Octaplex until true reversal agents for the Xa inhibitors become available. Remember TXA!

 

C) Trauma transfers from other centers

Expectation is trauma activation for all major trauma transfers, even if “direct” for a consultant.

 

D) Post intubation analgesia and sedation – “Is he hungry?”

No he isn’t! – biting the ET tube means it is time to crank up the meds. Infusions are superior to push dosing. Analgesia is often given in inadequate doses or not at all. Also consider the need for larger doses of opioids in patients on methadone.

 

E) Disposition from Emergency Department

NB Trauma Program Policy 2.4-010, which has long been approved by LMAC – commit this to memory!

“The TTL, in consultation with other inpatient services, shall determine the most appropriate service and level of care for admission, transfer or discharge.”

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EM Reflections – March 2018

Thanks to Dr. Paul Page for leading the discussions this month

Edited by Dr David Lewis 

 


 

Top tips from this month’s rounds:

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm – Size matters, but it isn’t everything

CME QUIZ

 

 


Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm – Which patients require urgent consult / transfer ?

AAA is a disease of older age. The prevalence of AAA among men aged 65 to 80 is 4 to 6 times higher than in women of the same age. The Canadian Task Force on Preventative Healthcare have recently (2017) made the following recommendations on screening:

Recommendation 1: We recommend one-time screening with ultrasound for AAA for men aged 65 to 80. (Weak recommendation; moderate quality of evidence)

Recommendation 2: We recommend not screening men older than 80 years of age for AAA. (Weak recommendation; low quality of evidence)

Recommendation 3: We recommend not screening women for AAA. (Strong recommendation; very low quality of evidence)

 

Emergency Physicians are trained to recognize the signs and symptoms of ruptured AAA (hypotension, tachycardia, pulsatile abdominal mass, back pain) and are always on the lookout for those curveball presentations e.g renal colic mimic, syncope, sciatica etc.

With the organization of centralized vascular services predominating in the majority of developed national health systems, patients with ruptured AAAs are now being transferred for specialist care. Recent evidence from the UK suggests that this practice is safe with no observed increased mortality or length of stay. and other studies have shown a benefit, with reduced mortality post service-centralization.

While there maybe benefits of centralization for patients, vascular surgeons and health economies, the initial management of the patient with AAA disease can be increasingly challenging for the Emergency Physician, especially if they are located in a peripheral hospital.

Let us consider a few scenarios:

  • A 70yr old man presents to a peripheral hospital (without CT), 120km from the vascular centre, with severe back pain and hypotension. Point of Care Ultrasound (PoCUS) confirms the diagnosis of a 7.5cm AAA.

This scenario is relatively straightforward. The patient is judiciously resuscitated (avoiding aggressive fluid infusion), and transferred, after discussion with on-call vascular surgery, as quickly as possible directly to the receiving hospital’s vascular OR.

 

  • A 70yr old man presents to a peripheral hospital (without CT), 120km from the vascular centre, with moderate flank pain and normal vital signs. They are known to have a 3.7cm AAA (last surveillance scan 6 months ago). PoCUS confirms the presence of an AAA measuring approx. 3.7cm. Urinalysis is negative.

This scenario is also relatively straightforward. While the cause of the flank pain has not been determined, the risk of AAA rupture is highly improbable. For men with an AAA of 4.0 cm or smaller, it takes more than 3.5 years to have a risk of rupture greater than 1%. Given the stable vital signs, low pain score and lack of significant change in AAA size, this patient can be safely worked-up initially at the peripheral hospital pending transfer for abdominal CT if diagnosis remains unclear or symptoms change.

 

  • A 70yr old man presents to a peripheral hospital (without CT), 120km from the vascular centre, with moderate flank pain and normal vital signs. They have no past medical history. PoCUS confirms the presence of a new 4.7cm AAA.  

This scenario starts to become more challenging. Is the AAA leaking? Is the AAA rapidly expanding? Has PoCUS accurately measured the AAA size, Is the AAA causing the symptoms or is there another diagnosis? While this AAA is still below the elective repair size (5.5cm), the rate of growth is not know (and this is important), 4.7cm AAAs do occasionally rupture and rapidly expanding AAA’s can cause pain (the phenomena is more common in inflammatory and mycotic aetiologies). In this scenario the safest approach would be to organize transfer for an urgent CT and to arrange for Vascular Surgey consult immediately thereafter.

 

 

Salmonella aortitis may appear after a febrile gastroenteritis. The common location of primary aortitis and aneurysm formation is at the posterior wall of the suprarenal or supraceliac aorta – . 2010; 3(1): 7–15.

 

Aortitis is the all-encompassing term ascribed to inflammation of the aorta. The most common causes of aortitis are the large-vessel vasculitides including GCA and Takayasu arteritis. The majority of cases of aortitis are non-infectious, however an infectious cause must always be considered, as treatment for infectious and non-infectious aortitis is significantly different.

This article provides a detailed summary of the diagnosis and management of Aortitis

 


CME QUIZ

EM Reflections - March 2018 - CME Quiz

EM Reflections – March 2018 – CME Quiz

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EM Reflections – February 2018

Thanks to Dr. Paul Page for leading the discussions this month

Edited by Dr David Lewis 

 


 

Top tips from this month’s rounds:

Pleuritic Chest Pain – Don’t forget the Abdomen

Headache – Not always Migraine

Epistaxis – Posterior Bleed

CME QUIZ

 


Pleuritic Chest Pain – Don’t forget the Abdomen

The commonest causes of pleuritic chest pain (pleurisy) presenting to the ED include:

  • Pulmonary embolus
  • Pneumonia
  • Pericarditis
  • Myocardial infarct
  • Pneumothorax

Once these have been ruled out consider the following differential diagnosis:

ref: American Family Physician (May 2007)

 

Another differential to consider is:

Perforated peptic ulcer

This can result in localized sub-diaphragmatic peritonitis that can result in pleuritic chest pain

 

Tips:

  • If a CT Chest has been performed – look for free air under the diaphragm
  • Always document an abdominal exam when assessing a patient with pleuritic chest pain
  • Although radiologists are highly skilled, like any physician, they are not infallible. Conservative estimates suggest an error rate of 4%. See this excellent article: The Epidemiology of Error in Radiology and Strategies for Error Reduction
  • Wherever possible physicians should always review the images from CT and X-Ray prior to reading the formal radiology report.

Arrows depicting free air on erect CXR – note the double stomach bubble sign on the left

Free air seen on lower slice of CT Chest. Easily mistaken for bowel

 

 


Headache – Not always migraine

The commonest cause of headache presenting to the ED is migraine

The features of migraine headache are well documented in this article – The diagnosis and treatment of chronic migraine

 

The differential diagnosis for patients presenting with headache is large. This excellent website (https://ddxof.com/) provides algorithms to help consider the differential diagnosis in the cardinal EM presentations.

From: DDxof.com

 

Another differential to consider is:

Anemia

Sub-acute onset anemia secondary to chronic blood loss e.g menorrhagia, chronic GI bleed, etc can present with fatigue, visual disturbance and headache.

Tips:

  • Patients who present to ED with a new headache (no previous hx of primary headache syndrome or change in symptoms) should have baseline investigations including CBC and Glucose.
  • Always review the paramedic and triage notes for supplementary information and the presence of additional symptoms that may broaden or narrow the differential.
  • Patient ethnicity and skin colour may mask the presence of anemia.

 

 

 

 


Epistaxis – Posterior Bleed

Posterior epistaxis is a difficult condition to manage and is associated with a number of acute and serious complications. In this study, 3.7% required intubation.

The #FOAM Blog post provides an excellent outline to the management of posterior epistaxis – EMDocs.net

The Emergency Department Management of Posterior Epistaxis

 

Posterior Nasal Packing – video

 

 

Tips:

  • All cases of major bleeding, including epistaxis should be initially managed in the highest acuity areas of the ED. Patients can then be rapidly stepped down and relocated to lower acuity areas if determined to be lower risk after initial assessment.
  • Consider using a suction device to aid intubation in cases of massive obscuring oro/naso-pharynx haemorrhage.

PulmCrit: Large-bore suction for intubation: strategies & devices

 


 

 

CME QUIZ

EM Reflections - Feb 18 - CME Quiz

EM Reflections – Nov 17 – CME Quiz

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Great ideas and making things better

I heard Dr. Dylan Blacquiere speaking on the radio while driving home after one of those busy D2 shifts on Friday, and it really cheered me up to hear him describe how we all in Saint John are leading the way in managing acute stroke care. http://www.cbc.ca/player/play/1152508483846
From EMS, through Emergency Medicine, diagnostic and intervention radiology, internal medicine and neurology, Saint John Regional Hospital (probably more appropriately Saint John University Hospital) provides a world class service for stroke patients in New Brunswick.
This got me thinking about many of the other innovations and ideas that we continue to push forward locally, especially relating to emergency medicine, and how important it is not to let ourselves become disillusioned by busy shifts, perceived administrative inertia, perceived injustices, crowding and many of the negatives we face, and will likely continue to face for sometime.
To name but a few, we can be proud of the integrated STEMI program we have from EMS to Cath Lab, the Point of Care Ultrasound program that leads in this nationally and beyond, the new Trauma Team leadership program, the patient wellness initiatives such as the photography competition corridor that make things just a little brighter for patients, the regionally dominant and growing simulation program, the regional and local nursing education programs, the nationally unique and hugely popular 3 year EM residency program, the impact of our faculty on medical education at DMNB, the leading clinical care provided by a certified faculty of emergency physicians, our website, our multidisciplinary M&M and quality programs, many of the research initiatives underway including development of an ECMO/ECPR program with the NB Heart Centre, improving detection of domestic violence, innovations around tackling crowding, preventing staff burnout, better radiology requesting, encouraging exercise prescriptions, and much more.
I was particularly impressed how Dylan explained the integrative approach that was required to improve stroke care, and how that was achieved here. There are many other areas that we can also improve, innovate and lead in. Every day we see ways to make things better.
I hope that at this point in our department’s journey, we can continue to make the changes that matter, for patients, our departmental staff, physicians, nurses and support staff alike.
I encourage all of us to think of one area we can improve, to plan for change and for us all to support each other to achieve those improvements. Some of our residents are embarking on very interesting projects, such as designing early pregnancy clinic frameworks, models to improve performance under stress, and simulating EMS ECPR algorithms – all new innovations, not just chart reviews of what we are already doing. I encourage us all to support them, and others with these projects, and to begin to create innovation priorities for the department.
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Trauma Reflections – December 2017

Thanks to Dr. Andrew Lohoar and Sue Benjamin for leading the discussions this month

 


 

Major points of interest:

 

A) Burns – Get out your crayons……

Accurate documentation of total body surface involved is key to determination of appropriate initial fluid resuscitation. Parkland formula = 4ml Ringer’s lactate x %BSA x kg – 1⁄2 in first 8 hours. Only count 2nd and 3rd degree burns. Lund and Browder documentation sheets. Urinary output will influence adjustment of fluid rates, so careful documentation of ins/outs is important.

B) Trauma in Maine – Get me out of here!

Canadian citizens injured in the U.S. often are transferred to NB for further investigation and management. TCP does NOT coordinate these transfers. Expectation is that the TTL will communicate with the sending physician and/or receiving consultant and manage as we would any other transfer from another facility.

C) Trauma transfers from other centers

Expectation is trauma activation for all major trauma transfers, even if “direct” for a consultant.

D) Crash 3- We are recruiting….

We are recruiting to the CRASH 3 study. Please familiarize yourself with eligibility criteria – adult, TBI < 3 hours isolated TBI.

E) Pre-alert of consultants – “Call me back when he gets there…”

In cases where immediate need for surgical consultation is clear, TTL should “pre-alert” consultants with ETA. Simultaneous arrival of consultant and patient is the goal.

F) Trauma activation package

Folder box on counter in room #19 has trauma activation packages – one stop shopping for all documents needed. Please fill out ‘MD Trauma Activation Log’ for every activation.
“SJRH ED Trauma Process Checklist” is in package and is a very useful prompt. Call it overhead. Put on a sticker.

G) Documentation

Documentation is important. Consider verbalizing full physical exam during secondary survey for documentation RN to chart on page 3 of trauma notes. MD can sign these notes. This will free up space on ED chart for “higher level” documentation such as list of injuries and treatments.

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Trauma Reflections – October 2017

Thanks to Dr. Andrew Lohoar and Sue Benjamin for leading the discussions this month

 


 

Major points of interest:

 

A) Tranexamic acid administration

It should be given to patients “who have, or are at risk for, significant hemorrhage”.
It has to be given within 3 hours of injury to be of benefit.

Loading dose of 1 gram over 10 minutes and start the infusion as well – 1 gram over the next 8 hours. .

B) Trauma in elderly – Old people are very breakable.

This is a high-risk population with increased morbidity/mortality from all injuries, even simple falls. Consider liberal use of “pan scan” to delineate extent of injuries. Given decreased physiologic reserve, anticipate this group may decompensate and will benefit from observation in intensive care setting.

 

C) Crush injuries

Patients with crush injuries are at risk for rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure. Baseline CK is recommended as part of routine trauma panel. Ensure aggressive resuscitation in this group, with ongoing monitoring of urine output (100ml/hr.).

 

D) Time in Department – Have you noticed our department is really busy?

Keeping time spent in ED to a minimum is in the best interest of the trauma patient and decreases pressure on our departmental resources. This goal can be met by expediting imaging studies – holding patients for CT should not be regular practice. Goal should be time to CT < 1 hour.

Notify consultants as early as possible. “Pre-alert” consultants that will likely be required to attend to patients based on information from dispatch/ANB.

 

E) Pelvic fractures

Think pelvic fracture with motorcycle MVCs. This diagnosis should be considered during primary survey and resuscitation, using pelvic x-ray as adjunct. Like a tension pneumothorax, diagnosing an open book pelvic fracture with CT is considered bad form. When in doubt, apply pelvic binder and remove when pelvis has been cleared.

 

F) Limb threatening injuries

Open fractures and limb injuries with evidence of vascular compromise need prompt recognition and management. Antibiotics should be administered immediately after diagnosing an open fracture.
In cases where limb threatening injuries are being transferred to SJRH ED for orthopedics/vascular consultants, TTL should “pre-alert” consultants when ETA is established.

 

G) Pediatric trauma

Children with isolated head traumas may be transferred to SJRH ED for direct consultation with pediatrics. TTL should be aware/involved with assessing these patients on arrival in ED to determine if there has been deterioration en route.

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EM Reflections – September 2017

Thanks to Dr Paul Page for leading the discussion

Edited by Dr David Lewis

Top tips from this month’s rounds:

  1. Non-specific Abdo pain – Appendicitis is always high on the differential 

  2. Intoxicated patients are at high risk for Head Injury

  3. Acute Heart Failure has a higher mortality than acute NSTEMI

  4. Enhancing Morbidity and Mortality Rounds Quality


Non-specific Abdo pain – Appendicitis is always high on the differential 

Does a normal white count exclude appendicitis?No – Clinicians should be wary of reliance on either elevated temperature or total WBC count as an indicator of the presence of appendicitis. The ROC curve suggests there is no value of total WBC count or temperature that has sufficient sensitivity and specificity to be of clinical value in the diagnosis of appendicitis. Acad Emerg Med. 2004 Oct;11(10):1021-7.Clinical value of the total white blood cell count and temperature in the evaluation of patients with suspected appendicitis.

Does a normal CRP exclude appendicitis?No – Acad Emerg Med. 2015 Sep;22(9):1015-24. doi: 10.1111/acem.12746. Epub 2015 Aug 20. Accuracy of White Blood Cell Count and C-reactive Protein Levels Related to Duration of Symptoms in Patients Suspected of Acute Appendicitis.

 

A useful review on the diagnosis of appendicitis – JAMA. 2007 Jul 25; 298(4): 438–451. Does This Child Have Appendicitis?

 

Summary of Accuracy of Symptoms

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Summary of Accuracy of Signs

Download (PDF, 117KB)

 

 

Finally – Don’t forget Emergency Physicians can learn how to use Point of Care Ultrasound (PoCUS – ?Appendicitis) which can significantly improve diagnostic accuracy in experienced hands. Experience comes with practice.

J Med Radiat Sci. 2016 Mar; 63(1): 59–66. Published online 2016 Jan 20. doi:  10.1002/jmrs.154
Ultrasound of paediatric appendicitis and its secondary sonographic signs: providing a more meaningful finding

See SJRHEM PoCUS Quick Reference

PoCUS – Measurements and Quick Reference

 


Intoxicated patients are at high risk for Head Injury

Intoxicated patients with minor head injury are at significant risk for intracranial injury, with 8% of intoxicated patients in our cohort suffering clinically important intracranial injuries. The Canadian CT Head Rule and National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study criteria did not have adequate sensitivity for detecting clinically significant intracranial injuries in a cohort of intoxicated patients.

ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE 2013; 20:754–760. Traumatic Intracranial Injury in Intoxicated Patients With Minor Head Trauma

Canadian CT Head Rule not applicable to intoxicated patients (GCS<13)

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CMPA provide useful guidance on the duties expected in the management of intoxicated ED patients.

 

All intoxicated patients, even the so called ‘frequent fliers’ require a full assessment, including history (from 3rd parties if available), full examination (especially neurological), blood glucose level, neurological observations, and this assessment should be carefully documented.

 

Can we defer CT imaging for intoxicated patients presenting with possible brain injury?

This study suggests that deferring CT imaging while monitoring improving clinical status in alcohol-intoxicated patients with AMS and possible ICH is a safe ED practice. This practice follows the individual emergency physician’s comfort in waiting and will vary from one physician to another.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0735675716306805

 

Download (PDF, 172KB)

 

 


Acute Heart Failure has a higher mortality than acute NSTEMI

Cardiac markers are routinely used to exclude NSTEMI in patient presenting with chest pain. However the diagnosis of acute heart failure (AHF) is mainly clinical, including CXR, ECG, PoCUS.

Ultrasound B Lines and Heart Failure

 

There is good evidence that BNP can be helpful in ruling out AHF – BMJ 2015;350:h910

Recommended Link – Emergency Medicine Cardiac Research and Education Group

Download (PDF, 1.32MB)

 

 

Emergency Treatment of Acute Congestive Heart Failure

Most recent recommendations from Canadian Cardiovascular Society (2012)

  • 1 – We recommend supplemental oxygen be considered for patients who are hypoxemic; titrated to an oxygen saturation > 90% (Strong Recommendation, Moderate-Quality Evidence).

Values and preferences. This recommendation places relatively higher value on the physiologic studies demonstrating potential harm with the use of excess oxygen in normoxic patients and less value on long-term clinical usage of supplemental oxygen without supportive data.

  • 2 – We recommend CPAP or BIPAP not be used routinely (Strong Recommendation, Moderate-Quality Evidence).

Values and preferences. This recommendation places high weight on RCT data with a demonstrated lack of efficacy and with safety concerns in routine use. Treatment with BIPAP/CPAP might be appropriate for patients with persistent hypoxia and pulmonary edema.

  • 3 – We recommend intravenous diuretics be given as first-line therapy for patients with congestion (Strong Recommendation, Moderate-Quality Evidence).
  • 4 – We recommend for patients requiring intravenous diuretic therapy, furosemide may be dosed intermittently (eg, twice daily) or as a continuous infusion (Strong Recommendation, Moderate-Quality Evidence).
  • 5 – We recommend the following intravenous vasodilators, titrated to systolic BP (SBP) > 100 mm Hg, for relief of dyspnea in hemodynamically stable patients (SBP > 100 mm Hg):
    • i

      Nitroglycerin (Strong Recommendation, Moderate-Quality Evidence);

    • ii

      Nesiritide (Weak Recommendation, High-Quality Evidence);

    • iii

      Nitroprusside (Weak Recommendation, Low-Quality Evidence).

Values and preferences. This recommendation places a high value on the relief of the symptom of dyspnea and less value on the lack of efficacy of vasodilators or diuretics to reduce hospitalization or mortality.

  • 6 – We recommend hemodynamically stable patients do not routinely receive inotropes like dobutamine, dopamine, or milrinone (Strong Recommendation, High-Quality Evidence).

Values and preferences. This recommendation for inotropes place high value on the potential harm demonstrated when systematically studied in clinical trials and less value on potential short term hemodynamic effects of inotropes.

  • 7 – We recommend continuation of chronic β-blocker therapy with AHF, unless the patient is symptomatic from hypotension or bradycardia (Strong Recommendation, Moderate-Quality Evidence).

Values and preferences. This recommendation places higher value on the RCT evidence of efficacy and safety to continue β-blockers, the ability of clinicians to use clinical judgement and lesser value on observational evidence for patients with AHF.

  • 8 – We recommend tolvaptan be considered for patients with symptomatic or severe hyponatremia (< 130 mmol/L) and persistent congestion despite standard therapy, to correct hyponatremia and the related symptoms (Weak Recommendation, Moderate-Quality Evidence).

Values and preferences. This recommendation places higher value on the correction of symptoms and complications related to hyponatremia and lesser value on the lack of efficacy of vasopressin antagonists to reduce HF-related hospitalizations or mortality.

 

Emergency Medicine Cases – Episode 4: Acute Congestive Heart Failure 

In Summary

  • AHF is a serious life-threatening condition in its own right, excluding NSTEMI does not change that. Appropriate management and disposition (almost always admission) is required.
  • Oxygen and intravenous Diuretics are the first-line  treatment
  • Nitrates are recommended in the relief of dyspnea in hemodynamically stable patients (SBP > 100 mm Hg)

 


Enhancing Morbidity and Mortality Rounds Quality

The Ottawa M&M Model

CalderMM-Rounds-Guide-2012

 

 

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Trauma Reflections – August 2017

Thanks to Dr. Andrew Lohoar and Sue Benjamin for leading the discussions this month

 


 

Major points of interest:

 

A) Tranexamic acid administration

It should be given to patients “who have, or are at risk for, significant hemorrhage”. It has to be given within 3 hours of injury to be of benefit.
Free fluid on POCUS? Discussing trauma transfer from peripheral facility? “Trauma bloods” have been ordered? – Think TXA.

Isolated head injury patients may be candidates for CRASH 3 study.

“I don’t ask myself if I should give it, I ask myself why I shouldn’t give it!” – Dr Jay Mekwan, airway guru and trauma enthusiast

B) Injured patients self-presenting to department

Trauma patients that “walk-in” to department may have significant injuries. Be vigilant with this group, especially if a significant MOI is described.

C) Disposition

Patients with significant injuries, but not needing immediate surgical intervention, should be admitted/observed in ICU x 24 hrs. TTLs have a duty/right in policy to effect appropriate disposition setting. Department head and/or chief of staff are available to assist if needed.

D) Time to CT

Results of CT scan are often critical to determining next steps in treatment. CT should be ordered early. If more than one patient is waiting for CT, prioritize and communicate with staff as to which patient should go first.

 

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