>EM Reflections – June 2019 – Part 1

Thanks to Dr. Joanna Middleton for leading the discussions this month

Edited by Dr David Lewis 


Discussion Topics

  1. When is a pregnancy not a pregnancy?
  2. Caustic Ingestions
  3. Transient Ischemic Attack – Emergency Medicine (see part 2)

When is a pregnancy not a pregnancy?

Molar Pregnancy

Hydatidiform mole (molar pregnancy) is a relatively rare complication of fertilization with an incidence in the United States of 0.63 to 1.1 per 1000 pregnancies, although rates vary geographically. It is included in the spectrum of gestational trophoblastic diseases and is comprised of both complete molar pregnancies (CM) and partial molar pregnancies (PM).

The most well characterized risk factor for CM is extreme of maternal age. Maternal ages less than 20 or greater than 40 years have been associated with relative risks for CM as high as 10- and 11-fold greater respectively. Other potential risk factors include oral contraceptive use, maternal type A or AB blood groups, maternal smoking, and maternal alcohol abuse.

Molar pregnancy typically presents in the first trimester and may be associated with a wide array of findings, including vaginal bleeding (most common), uterine size larger than expected according to pregnancy date (CM), uterine size smaller than expected according to pregnancy date (PM), excessive beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hcg) levels, anemia, hyperemesis gravidum, theca lutein cysts, pre-eclampsia, and respiratory distress.Studies comparing modern clinical presentations of CM with historical presentations have demonstrated a significant reduction in many of the classic presenting signs and symptoms such as vaginal bleeding and excessive uterine size. This reduction is attributed to early detection by transvaginal ultrasound and increasingly sensitive β-hcg assays. Numerous studies evaluating the efficacy of ultrasound in detecting molar pregnancy demonstrate a 57–95 percent sensitivity for the detection of CM compared to only 18–49 percent sensitivity for PM.

More here: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2791738/

PoCUS – Normal Early Pregnancy

Arrow = Yolk sac (YS) within Gestational sac (GS), note the hyperechoic decidual reaction surrounding GS, Arrow head = Fetal Pole

PoCUS – Molar Pregnancy

 

PoCUS SIgns:

  • enlarged uterus
  • may be seen as an intrauterine mass with cystic spaces without any associated fetal parts
    • the multiple cystic structures classically give a “snow storm” or “bunch of grapes” type appearance.
  • may be difficult to diagnose in the first trimester 6
    • may appear similar to a normal pregnancy or as an empty gestational sac
    • <50% are diagnosed in the first trimester
  • More on Radiopedia.org

Useful post from County EM blog- click here

 


Caustic Ingestions

 

 

Hydrochloric Acid – pH 1-2

Dangerous if pH <2 or >11.5-12

For alkaline – higher percent, shorter time to burn – 10%NaOH – 1 min of contact to produce deep burn, 30% within seconds

 

Acid – painful to swallow so usually less volume, bad taste so more gagging/laryngeal injury, more aqueous so less esophageal injury, pylorospasm prevents entry into duodenum producing stagnation and prominent antrum injury.  Food is protective.  Acid ingestion typically produces a superficial coagulation necrosis that thromboses the underlying mucosal blood vessels and consolidates the connective tissue, thereby forming a protective eschar.  In enough amount – perforation.

Alkali – burns esophagus more, neutralized in stomach.  Liquefaction necrosis.

Management

Decontamination: Activated charcoal / GI decontamination / neutralisation procedures are contraindicated

Obtaining meaningful info from endoscopy after treatment with charcoal is very difficult

If asymptomatic – observe, trial of oral intake at 4 hours after exposure, earlier if low suspicion or likely benign ingestion after discussion with Poisons Centre

Symptomatic patients or those with a significant ingestion

(high-concentration acid or alkali or high volume [>200 ml] of a low-concentration acid or alkali)

Upper GI endoscopy should be performed early (3 to 48 hrs) and preferably during the first 24 hrs after ingestion to evaluate extent of esophageal and gastric damage and guide management.  Endoscopy is contraindicated in patients who have evidence of GI perforation. (Ingestion of >60 mL of concentrated HCl leads to severe injury to the GI tract with necrosis and perforation, rapid onset of MODS and is usually fatal – endoscopy within 24 hours (unless asymptomatic at 4 hours)

Complications – 1/3 develop strictures – directly related to depth/severity of injury, years later

 


 

TAKE HOME POINTS

  1. PV Bleed, Hyperemesis, PoCUS = bunch Grapes or Snowstorm – consider Molar Pregnancy
  2. Don’t use Activated Charcoal for Caustic Ingestions
  3. Discuss Caustic Ingestions with Poisons Centre
  4. Consider early endoscopy
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