>Pediatric Hip PoCUS

Pediatric Hip PoCUS

PoCUS Pearl

Dr. Sultan Ali Alrobaian

Dalhousie EM PoCUS Fellowship

Saint John, NB

@AlrobaianSultan

 

Reviewed and Edited by Dr. David Lewis


 

Case:

A 5 year old healthy boy, came to ED with history of limping since waking that morning. He had worsening right hip discomfort. No history of trauma. He had history of cold symptoms for the last 3 days associated with documented low grade fever.

On physical examination, he looked uncomfortable and unwell looking, he had temperature of 38.1 C, HR 130, BP 110/70, RR 20 and O2 saturation of 98% on RA. He was non-weight-bearing with decreased ROM of right hip because of pain.

Pelvis x-ray was unremarkable, he had WBC of 14.4 x 103  and CRP of 40 .

PoCUS of the right hip was performed.


 

Pediatric Hip Ultrasound

Ultrasonography is an excellent modality to evaluate pathologies in both the intra-articular and extra-articular soft tissues including muscles, tendons, and bursae. PoCUS to detect hip effusion can serve as an adjunct to the history and physical examination in case with hip pain.  It is easily accessible, no radiation exposure and low cost.

Technique:

The child should be in supine position. Expose the hip with drapes for patient comfort. If the patient will tolerate it, position the leg in slight abduction and external rotation. A high frequency linear probe is the preferred transducer to scan the relatively superficial pediatric hip, use the curvilinear probe if increased depth is required.

With the patient lying supine, identify the greater trochanter on the symptomatic hip of the patient. Place the linear probe in the sagittal oblique plane parallel to the long axis of the femoral neck (with the indicator toward the patient’s head).

If the femoral neck cannot easily be found, it can be approached using the proximal femur. Place the probe transversely across the upper thigh. Identify the cortex of the proximal femur and then move the probe proximally until the femoral neck appears medially, then slightly rotate the probe and move medially to align in the long axis of the femoral neck.

Assistance is often required from a parent who may be asked to provide reassurance, apply the gel and help with positioning.

Both symptomatic and asymptomatic hips should be examined.

Negative hip ultrasound in a limping child should prompt examination of the knee and ankle joint (for effusion) and the tibia (for toddler’s fracture)

Hip X-ray should be performed to rule out other causes (depending on age – e.g. Perthes, Osteomyelitis, SCFE, Tumour). Limb X-ray should be performed if history of trauma or NAI.

 

Anatomy of the Pediatric Hip:

The ED Physician should readily identify the sonographic landmarks of the pediatric hip. These landmarks include the femoral head, epiphysis and neck, acetabulum, joint capsule and iliopsoas muscle and tendon.

 

A normal joint may have a small anechoic stripe (normal hypoechoic joint cartilage) between cortex and capsule. This will measure less than 2mm and be symmetrical between hips.

 

Ultrasound Findings:

Measure the maximal distance between the anterior surface of the femoral neck and the posterior surface of the iliopsoas muscle. An effusion will result in a larger anechoic stripe (>2mm) that takes on a lenticular shape as the capsule distends. Asymmetry between hips is confirmatory. Synovial thickening may also be visualized.

FH- Femoral Head, S- Synovium, E – Effusion, FN – Femoral Neck

Criteria for a pediatric hip effusion is:

  • A capsular-synovial thickness of 5 mm measured at the concavity of the femoral neck, from the anterior surface of the femoral neck to the posterior surface of the iliopsoas muscle
  • OR a 2-mm difference compared to the asymptomatic contralateral hip

Right hip effusion, normal left hip, arrow heads – joint capsule, IP – iliopsoas


Interpretation

PoCUS has high sensitivity and specificity for pediatric hip effusion.

  • —
  • Sensitivity of 90%
  • Specificity of 100%
  • Positive predictive value of 100%
  • Negative predictive value of 92%

 

PoCUS cannot determine the cause of an effusion. It cannot differentiate between transient synovitis and septic arthritis. Diagnosis will be determined by combining history, pre-test probability, examination, inflammatory markers and PoCUS findings. If in doubt, septic arthritis is the primary differential diagnosis until proven otherwise.

Several clinical prediction algorithms have been proposed. This post from pedemmorsels.com outlines these nicely:

 

Septic Arthritis

 

 


 

Back to our case:

Ultrasonography cannot definitively distinguish between septic arthritis and transient synovitis, the ED physician’s concern for septic arthritis should be based on history, clinical suspicion and available laboratory findings.

The patient was diagnosed as case of septic arthritis. The patient received intravenous antibiotics empirically. Pediatric orthopedic consultation was obtained, and ED arthrocentesis was deferred as the patient was immediately taken to the operating room for hip joint aspiration and irrigation, confirming the diagnosis.


 

References

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email