Medical Student Clinical Pearl – PoCUS and Clavicle Fractures

Using PoCUS to diagnose clavicular fractures

Medical Student Pearl – May 2018

Danielle Rioux – Med III Class of 2019, Dalhousie Medicine New Brunswick 

Reviewed by Dr. Mandy Peach and Dr. David Lewis

Case: A 70 year-old man presented to the emergency department with pain in his left shoulder and clavicular region following a skiing accident. He slipped and fell on his left lateral shoulder while he was on skis at the ski hill. He has visible swelling in his left shoulder and clavicular region, and was not able to move his left arm.

On exam: The patient was in no sign of distress. He was standing and holding his left arm adducted close to his body, supporting his left arm with his right hand. There was swelling and ecchymosis in the left clavicle, mid-shaft region, with focal tenderness. On palpation, there was crepitation, tenderness, swelling, and warmth in this region. He was unable to move his left shoulder due to pain. His neurovascular exam on his left arm was normal. Auscultation of his lungs revealed normal air-entry, bilaterally and no adventitious sounds.

Point of Care Ultrasound (PoCUS): We used a linear, high-frequency transducer and placed it in the longitudinal plane on the normal right clavicle (see Image 1.), and the fractured left clavicle (see Image 2.). Image 3 shows the fractured clavicle in the transverse plane.

 

Image 1. PoCUS of normal right clavicle along the long axis of the clavicle (arrows depict the hyperechoic superficial cortex with deep acoustic shadowing).

 

 

Clip 1. PoCUS of normal right clavicle along the short axis of the clavicle. The transducer is moving from the lateral to medial, note the visible hyperechoic curved superficial cortex and the subclavian vessels at the end of the clip. 

 

Image 2. PoCUS of normal right clavicle along the short axis of the clavicle (arrows depict the hyperechoic superficial cortex with deep acoustic shadowing).

 

 

Image 3. PoCUS of a fracture in the left clavicle along the long axis of the clavicle

 

 

Clip 2. PoCUS of a fracture of the left clavicle, viewed in the long axis of the clavicle. Compare this view with image 1.

 

 

 

Clip 3. PoCUS of a fracture in the left clavicle viewed in the short axis of the clavicle. Compare this view with Clip 1. Note the fracture through the visible cortex and the displacement that becomes apparent halfway through the clip.

 

Radiographic findings: Radiographic findings of the left clavicle reveal a mid-shaft spiral clavicular fracture.  (Image 4).

Image 4. Radiographic image of fractured left clavicle.

 

Take home point: Research has shown that Ultrasonography is a sensitive diagnostic tool in the evaluation of fractures (Chapman & Black, 2003; Eckert et al., 2014; Chen et al., 2016).

This case provides an example of how PoCUS can be used to diagnose clavicle fractures in the emergency department. In a rural or office setting where radiography is not always available, PoCUS can be used to triage patients efficiently into groups of those with a fracture and those with a low likelihood of a fracture. This would enable more efficient medical referrals while improving cost-effectiveness and patient care.

 

References:

Chapman, D. & Black, K. 2003. Diagnostic musculoskeletal ultrasound for emergency physicians. Ultrasound, 25(10):60

Eckert, K., Janssen, N., Ackermann, O., Schweiger, B., Radeloff, E. & Liedgens, P. 2014 Ultrasound diagnosis of supracondylar fractures in children. Eur J Trauma Emerg Surg., 40:159–168

Chen, K.C., Chor-Ming, A., Chong, C.F. & Wang, T.L. 2016. An overview of point-of-care ultrasound for soft tissue and musculoskeletal applications in the emergency department, Journal of Intensive Care, 4:55

 

This post was copyedited by Dr. Mandy Peach

 

 

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