Pediatric Hip PoCUS

Pediatric Hip PoCUS

PoCUS Pearl

Dr. Sultan Ali Alrobaian

Dalhousie EM PoCUS Fellowship

Saint John, NB

@AlrobaianSultan

 

Reviewed and Edited by Dr. David Lewis


 

Case:

A 5 year old healthy boy, came to ED with history of limping since waking that morning. He had worsening right hip discomfort. No history of trauma. He had history of cold symptoms for the last 3 days associated with documented low grade fever.

On physical examination, he looked uncomfortable and unwell looking, he had temperature of 38.1 C, HR 130, BP 110/70, RR 20 and O2 saturation of 98% on RA. He was non-weight-bearing with decreased ROM of right hip because of pain.

Pelvis x-ray was unremarkable, he had WBC of 14.4 x 103  and CRP of 40 .

PoCUS of the right hip was performed.


 

Pediatric Hip Ultrasound

Ultrasonography is an excellent modality to evaluate pathologies in both the intra-articular and extra-articular soft tissues including muscles, tendons, and bursae. PoCUS to detect hip effusion can serve as an adjunct to the history and physical examination in case with hip pain.  It is easily accessible, no radiation exposure and low cost.

Technique:

The child should be in supine position. Expose the hip with drapes for patient comfort. If the patient will tolerate it, position the leg in slight abduction and external rotation. A high frequency linear probe is the preferred transducer to scan the relatively superficial pediatric hip, use the curvilinear probe if increased depth is required.

With the patient lying supine, identify the greater trochanter on the symptomatic hip of the patient. Place the linear probe in the sagittal oblique plane parallel to the long axis of the femoral neck (with the indicator toward the patient’s head).

If the femoral neck cannot easily be found, it can be approached using the proximal femur. Place the probe transversely across the upper thigh. Identify the cortex of the proximal femur and then move the probe proximally until the femoral neck appears medially, then slightly rotate the probe and move medially to align in the long axis of the femoral neck.

Assistance is often required from a parent who may be asked to provide reassurance, apply the gel and help with positioning.

Both symptomatic and asymptomatic hips should be examined.

Negative hip ultrasound in a limping child should prompt examination of the knee and ankle joint (for effusion) and the tibia (for toddler’s fracture)

Hip X-ray should be performed to rule out other causes (depending on age – e.g. Perthes, Osteomyelitis, SCFE, Tumour). Limb X-ray should be performed if history of trauma or NAI.

 

Anatomy of the Pediatric Hip:

The ED Physician should readily identify the sonographic landmarks of the pediatric hip. These landmarks include the femoral head, epiphysis and neck, acetabulum, joint capsule and iliopsoas muscle and tendon.

 

A normal joint may have a small anechoic stripe (normal hypoechoic joint cartilage) between cortex and capsule. This will measure less than 2mm and be symmetrical between hips.

 

Ultrasound Findings:

Measure the maximal distance between the anterior surface of the femoral neck and the posterior surface of the iliopsoas muscle. An effusion will result in a larger anechoic stripe (>2mm) that takes on a lenticular shape as the capsule distends. Asymmetry between hips is confirmatory. Synovial thickening may also be visualized.

FH- Femoral Head, S- Synovium, E – Effusion, FN – Femoral Neck

Criteria for a pediatric hip effusion is:

  • A capsular-synovial thickness of 5 mm measured at the concavity of the femoral neck, from the anterior surface of the femoral neck to the posterior surface of the iliopsoas muscle
  • OR a 2-mm difference compared to the asymptomatic contralateral hip

Right hip effusion, normal left hip, arrow heads – joint capsule, IP – iliopsoas


Interpretation

PoCUS has high sensitivity and specificity for pediatric hip effusion.

  • —
  • Sensitivity of 90%
  • Specificity of 100%
  • Positive predictive value of 100%
  • Negative predictive value of 92%

 

PoCUS cannot determine the cause of an effusion. It cannot differentiate between transient synovitis and septic arthritis. Diagnosis will be determined by combining history, pre-test probability, examination, inflammatory markers and PoCUS findings. If in doubt, septic arthritis is the primary differential diagnosis until proven otherwise.

Several clinical prediction algorithms have been proposed. This post from pedemmorsels.com outlines these nicely:

 

Septic Arthritis

 

 


 

Back to our case:

Ultrasonography cannot definitively distinguish between septic arthritis and transient synovitis, the ED physician’s concern for septic arthritis should be based on history, clinical suspicion and available laboratory findings.

The patient was diagnosed as case of septic arthritis. The patient received intravenous antibiotics empirically. Pediatric orthopedic consultation was obtained, and ED arthrocentesis was deferred as the patient was immediately taken to the operating room for hip joint aspiration and irrigation, confirming the diagnosis.


 

References

 

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Color Flow Doppler to Assess Cardiac Valve Competence

Color Flow Doppler to Assess Cardiac Valve Competence

Resident Clinical Pearl (RCP) April 2019

Dr. Scott Foley – CCFP-EM PGY3 Dalhousie University, Halifax NS

Reviewed by Dr. David Lewis

 


 

Background:

When colour Doppler is initiated, the machine uses the principals of the Doppler effect to determine the direction of movement of the tissues off which it is reflecting.

The Doppler effect is the change in frequency of a wave in relation to an observer who is moving relative to a wave source. It was named after the Austrian physicist Christian Doppler who first described the phenomenon in 1842. The classic example is the change in pitch of a siren heard from an ambulance as it moves towards and away from an observer.

These principles are applied to POCUS in the form of colour Doppler where direction of flow is reflected by the colour (Red = moving towards the probe, Blue = moving away from the probe), and the velocity of the flow is reflected by the intensity of the colour (brighter colour = higher velocity).
*Note: the colour does not represent venous versus arterial flow.

 

The use of colour Doppler ultrasound can be useful in the emergency department to determine vascular flow in peripheral vessels as well as through the heart. It is one way to determine cardiac valve competency by focusing on flow through each valve.


 

Obtaining Views:

To optimize valve assessment, proper views of each valve must be obtained. It is best to have the direction of the ultrasound waves be parallel to the direction of flow. External landmarks for the views used are seen below:

  • Mitral Valve and Tricuspid Valve: The best view for each of these is the apical 4 chamber view. If unable to obtain this view, the mitral valve can be seen in parasternal long axis as well.
  • Aortic Valve: The best view is the apical 5 chamber or apical 3 chamber but are challenging to obtain. Instead, the parasternal long axis is frequently used.
  • Pulmonic Valve: Although not commonly assessed, the parasternal short axis can be used.
  • Visit 5minutesono.com for video instruction on obtaining views

Parasternal long axis: MV, AV

Parasternal short axis: PV, TV

Apical 4 chamber: TV, MV


 

Assessing Valvular Competency:

How to examine valvular competency:

  1. Get view and locate valve in question
  2. Visually examine valve: opening, closing, calcification
  3. Use colour Doppler:
    1. Place colour box over valve (as targeted as possible (resize select box) to not include other valves)
    2. Freeze image and scroll through images frame by frame
    3. Examine for pathologic colour jets in systole and diastole
  4. Estimating severity:
    1. Grade 1 – jet noticeable just at valve
    2. Grade 2 – jet extending out 1/3 of atrium/ventricle
    3. Grade 3 – jet extending out 2/3 of atrium/ventricle
    4. Grade 4 – jet filling entire atrium/ventricle

See video tutorial below for more


Mitral Regurgitation A4C

Tricuspid Regurgitation A4C

Aortic Stenosis PSLA


Bottom line:

Color flow Doppler on POCUS is a straightforward way to assess for valvular competency in the Emergency Department. A more detailed valvular assessment requires skill, knowledge and experience.

 


Useful Video Tutorials:

Mitral Regurgitation

 

Aortic Stenosis vs Sclerosis

Tricuspid Valve


References:

  1. https://www.radiologycafe.com/medical-students/radiology-basics/ultrasound-overview
  2. By Patrick J. Lynch and C. Carl Jaffe – http://www.yale.edu/imaging/echo_atlas/views/index.html, CC BY 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=21448310
  3. 5minutesono.com
  4. ECCU ShoC 2018 powerpoint, Paul Atkinson, David Lewis
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Shining a light on acute vision loss: PoCUS for the retina

Shining a light on acute vision loss: PoCUS for retinal pathology

Resident Clinical Pearl (RCP) August 2019

Dr. Devon Webster – PGY2 FMEM Dalhousie University, Saint John NB

Reviewed by Dr. Kavish Chandra

 

It’s a quiet night in RAZ and you pick up your next chart- a 68 year old Ms. Iris Snellen has come in with new onset, painless, monocular vision loss. You pick up the ophthalmoscope to perform fundoscopy, and despite your best attempts, like many ED physicians before you, you see nothing helpful. So instead you pick up your investigative tool of choice, the ultrasound probe, and begin your ocular POCUS exam…


Anatomy and pathophysiology

The retina is composed of multiple layers of neurons that allow for the human eye to convert light energy (photons) into images within the occipital brain. The retina sits on top of the vascular choroid which provides blood flow.

Fundoscopy allows for visualization of the following structures:

  • Optic disc
  • The macula (central, high-resolution, color vision)
  • The fovea (sits centrally in the macula and provides sharp, central vision)
  • The retinal artery and vein

https://stanfordmedicine25.stanford.edu/the25/fundoscopic.html

 

PoCUS is adjunctive test to assess for vision-threatening and common conditions impacting the eye such as retinal detachment (RD), posterior vitreous detachment (VD) and vitreous hemorrhage (VH).

A normal eye should allow you to visualize the following structures:

https://www.nuemblog.com/ocular

In retinal detachment, the retina is separated from the choroid either through formation of a hole in the retina, peeling away from the choroid if attached to the vitreous humour or through edematous infiltration between the two layers. Separation results in rapid ischemia and death of photoreceptors with subsequent vision-loss.

Posterior vitreous detachment is common and occurs secondary liquification of the gel-like vitreous body.

Vitreous hemorrhage can occur secondary trauma, spontaneous retinal tears or vitreous detachment or any cause of retinal neovasculiarzation such as in diabetes.

 


Retinal detachment and the DDx

When assessing your pt, a retinal detachment should be at the top of your list of diagnoses to rule out given that prompt recognition and referral to ophthalmology may be a vision-saving intervention.

On history she may describe the following features of RD:

  • Floaters: may appear as spiderwebs, a large spot that comes and goes that may ‘look like a big fly’ or a showering of many small black dots.
  • Painless monocular vision loss: may present as a ‘curtain descending’ across her vision and/or visual field loss.
  • Flashes: may be easier to see at night or in a dark room (consider turning off the lights in the exam room)

Assess for risk factors for retinal detachment:

  • Myopia (near-sightedness): Major risk factor!
  • Cataract surgery
  • Family history of retinal detachment
  • Diabetes
  • Glaucoma
  • Old age
  • History of posterior vitreous detachment

Physical exam:

  • Assess for changes in visual acuity
  • Assess for loss of visual fields
  • Fundoscopy may reveal advanced detachments however, early detachments are often not visible with direct fundoscopy. Advanced detachments may reveal absence of a red reflex and a billowing retinal flap.
  • Ultrasound!

Your DDx may include:

  • Posterior vitreous detachment
  • Vitreous hemorrhage
  • Ocular migraine
  • CRAO/CRVO
  • Amaurosis fugax

(see below for distinguishing features of the DDx)

 


The PoCUS assessment

Most ED physicians feel more comfortable with their ultrasonography skills over their fundoscopy skills. PoCUS is a fast, portable and radiation-free approach to assessing patients for potential vision-threatening pathology such as retinal detachment. While ultrasonography should not replace ophthalmologic assessment and fundoscopy, it can be used as an additional tool to support your primary diagnosis.

Most recently, Lanham, et al., published a prospective diagnostic study involving 225 patients and 75 ED providers that found POCUS was 96.9% sensitive and 88.1% specific for the diagnosis of retinal detachment1. While studies have varied in whether sensitivity was better than specificity or vice versa, ultimately each study has shown that when trained, emergency providers are quite good at identifying RD by US2,3. In addition to RD, Lanham, et al further found ED providers did well at identifying vitreous hemorrhage (sens 81.9%, sp 82.3%) and vitreous detachment (sens 42.5%, sp 96%).

Get the PoCUS Scan:

  • Place a tegaderm over the eye to protect it from US gel which may be painful. You may consider using topical freezing drops to limit irritation.
  • Use the linear probe and scan through the eye until you are able to visualize the optic nerve, the hypoechoic structure at the back of the eye
  • Have the patient look side to side/up and down as this will accentuate movement of retinal or vitreous pathology.
    1. Retinal detachment: Bright echogenic line that appears to have separated from the posterior eye/choroid and remains tethered to the optic nerve.
    2. Posterior vitreous detachment: Bright echogenic line separated from posterior eye/choroid that is detached from the optic nerve.
    3. Posterior vitreous hemorrhage: Vitreous shows fluid collection with variable echogenicity and ‘washing machine’ appearance.

Jacobsen et al. (2016). WestJEM. 17(2)

 

Differential of painless visual loss

 

Resources:

  1. Lahham S, et al. Point-of-Care Ultrasonography in the Diagnosis of Retinal Detachment, Vitreous Hemorrhage, and Vitreous Detachment in the Emergency Department. JAMA Netw Open. Published online April 12, 20192(4):e192162. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.2162
  2. Kim, D., et al. Test Characteristics of Point-of-care Ultrasound for the Diagnosis of Retinal Detachment in the Emergency Department. Academic Emergency Medicine. 2019;26[1]:16; http://bit.ly/2TEFutH
  3. Vrablik ME, et al. The diagnostic accuracy of bedside ocular ultrasonography for the diagnosis of retinal detachment: a systematic review and meta‐analysis. Ann Emerg Med 2015; 65( 199–203): e1.
  4. Mason, J. (Host). (2019 Jan). C3-Vision Loss-Retinal Detachment [Audio podast]. Retrieved from EMRAP: https://www.emrap.org/episode/c3visionloss/c3visionloss1 .
  5. Arroyo, J. (Jan 2018). Retinal Detachment. Retrieved from Uptodate: https://www.uptodate.com/contents/retinal-detachment
  6. Givre, S., et al. (Feb 2019). Amaurosis fugax (transient monocular or binocular visual loss). Retrieved from Uptodate: https://www.uptodate.com/contents/amaurosis-fugax-transient-monocular-or-binocular-visual-loss?search=painless%20monocular%20vision%20loss&source=search_result&selectedTitle=1~150&usage_type=default&display_rank=1
  7. Porfiris, G. (2015). ABCs of Emergency Medicine, 14th Edition, Chapter 23: Eye Emergencies.

 

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Ultrasound guided hematoma block for distal radius fractures

Ultrasound guided hematoma block for distal radius fractures

Resident Clinical Pearl (RCP) September 2019

Robert Dunfield – PGY1 FMEM Dalhousie University, Saint John NB

Reviewed by Dr. Kavish Chandra

 

Mr. JG, a 34 year old male snowboarder, presents to your busy emergency department after a snowboarding accident. He suffered a fall onto his left outstretched hand after hitting a jump that was approximately one foot high. Radiograph shows a closed distal radius fracture with significant  dorsal angulation.

Figure courtesy of Dr Pir Abdul Ahad Aziz, Radiopaedia.org, rID: 47908

Tonight is a busy shift and you’re working in a resource-limited department with very few staff. In speaking with the patient, he’s nervous about the prospect of procedural sedation and would prefer to not be “put to sleep to fix [his] wrist”. Luckily, your department recently purchased an ultrasound machine and the patient consents to a hematoma block prior to reduction.


What is a hematoma?

Following the initial impact that causes a fracture, the initial stage of bone healing involves a hematoma formation. In simple terms, a hematoma is a large blood clot that collects at the fracture site. Hematomas are rich in vascular supply and are the site of eventual soft callus formation; they’re the result of bony blood supply being disrupted at the site of the defect

 

Stages in Fracture Repair. The healing of a bone fracture follows a series of progressive steps: (a) A fracture hematoma forms. (b) Internal and external calli form. (c) Cartilage of the calli is replaced by trabecular bone. (d) Remodeling occurs.1

 

Hematoma blocks as an alternative to procedural sedation?

Compared to procedural sedation, hematoma blocks can be done safely when procedural sedation is not an option or is contraindicated. They also offer an alternative option for analgesia when an emergency department is busy and resources are lacking to safely perform procedural sedation.2

  • Procedural sedation requires a period of recovery after the procedure, hematoma blocks do not necessitate traditional post procedural recovery.3
  • Evidence that suggests post-procedure analgesia is similar in hematoma block patients compared to patients who undergo procedural sedation.4
  • Hematoma blocks are a form of local anaesthesia that can be used when reducing simple, closed distal long bone fractures, like the distal radius fracture in this case. They can also be performed to provide analgesia for nondisplaced fractures.2

 

Prior to the advent of bedside ultrasound, hematoma blocks were dependent on external anatomy landmarking, using “step-off” site of the bony deformity as the landmark for injection. This can be difficult, however, in fractures where swelling, habitus, or deformity can distort the anatomy of the hematoma.2 This is where ultrasound plays a role in identifying the deformity and therefore improves the precision of hematoma injection.

Contraindications to hematoma block include allergy to the anaesthetic being used, if the fracture is open, if there is cellulitis overlying the site of the fracture, and/or if there is a neurovascular deficit on exam of the affected limb.5

 

Performing  a hematoma block under US guidance

Mr. JG requires reduction of his distal radius fracture. Due to his uneasiness with procedural sedation, combined with the busy and resource-strained nature of your emergency department, a hematoma block under ultrasound guidance is performed.

 

  • Gain informed consent: The initial step in performing a hematoma block is similar to all medical procedures in that the patient undergoing the procedure should be informed of the risks associated with hematoma blocks and fracture reduction. These include, although rare, compartment syndrome, local anesthetic toxicity, acute carpal tunnel syndrome, and temporary paralysis of the upper limb6. Remember that maximum dose of lidocaine without epinephrine is 5mg/kg.
  • Reassess the neurovascular integrity of the limb: Prior to injecting the hematoma block, ensure you have confirmed neurovascular integrity of that limb.
  • Grab the supplies you’ll need: The following list is limited to the supplies needed for your hematoma block and does not include the supplies needed for fracture reduction and casting.
    • Ultrasound machine with a linear transducer probe
    • Tegaderm transparent film
    • Sterile lubricating jelly
    • Sterile skin marker
    • Sterile gloves
    • Chlorhexidine swabs x 3
    • 16G Needle (for drawing up analgesia)
    • 20G or 22G Needle (for injecting analgesia)
    • 10mL syringe
    • 1% lidocaine (approximately 10mL)
  • Landmark the hematoma using point of care ultrasound: Trace the bone’s cortex on the dorsal aspect of the forearm from the proximal aspect of the fracture towards the fracture site until you reach an interruption in the cortex of the radius (see below). Mark that site with your marker for injection.

Left: Sagittal image of left radius outlining an interruption in the radial cortex at the site of the hematoma. Right: Same image, edited to identify anatomy.8 Edited by Robert Dunfield PGY1-Dalhousie

  • Clean the site and prepare other materials: Clean the site with chlorhexidine swabs x 3. Allow it to dry while you prepare the remainder of your equipment. Draw up your 10mL of 1% lidocaine with the 16G needle and then change the needle to your 20 or 22G needle. A longer needle may be needed to reach the site of the hematoma.
  • Prepare your transducer: Clean your linear transducer and then put on your sterile gloves. With the help of an assistant apply the sterile tegaderm film to the liner transducer and place sterile lubricating jelly on the probe.
  • Insert needle under US guidance: Using the probe to visualize the site of the hematoma, simultaneously begin to insert the needle in a caudal fashion toward the hematoma, visualizing the needle in the long axis. Use the ultrasound image to follow the needle’s insertion.

Injection of hematoma block under ultrasound guidance.6 Modified by Robert Dunfield PGY1-Dalhousie

  • Inject the lidocaine: Inject 10mL of 1% lidocaine into the hematoma.
  • Give time for analgesia to take effect: Allow 5 to 10 minutes of time to allow the analgesia to take full effect, then reassess neurovascular integrity.
  • Proceed with the reduction.
  • Added note: It’s possible for distal radius fractures to have an associated ulnar styloid fracture, which will require repeating the same steps as described above, only at the side of the ulnar fracture.

 

Summary:

    • Hematoma blocks under ultrasound guidance can be done on certain distal long bone fractures that lack any contraindications
    • Use the ultrasound probe to trace the bone’s cortex and identify the site of the hematoma, then insert the needle into the hematoma under the guidance of your linear transducer.
    • Confirm needle placement into the hematoma by aspiration and inject 10mL of 1% lidocaine into the hematoma.
    • Allow 5 to 10 minutes of analgesia onset before reducing the fracture.
    • Remember to reassess the limb’s neurovascular integrity before and after the procedure.

Copyedited by Kavish Chandra

 

Resources:

  1. Rice University. Anatomy and Physiology. Chapter 6.5: Bone Repair. https://opentextbc.ca/anatomyandphysiology/chapter/6-5-fractures-bone-repair. Accessed: September 03, 2019. Last updated: unknown.
  2. Gottlieb M and Cosby K. Ultrasound-guided hematoma block for distal radial and ulnar fractures. Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2015;48(3):310-312.
  3. Alerhand S and Koyfman A. Ultrasound-Guided Hematoma Block. emDocs.net. http://www.emdocs.net/ultrasound-guided-hematoma-block/. Accessed: September 07, 2019. Last updated: December 21, 2014.
  4. Fathi M, Moezzi M, Abbasi S, Farsi D, Zare MA, Hafezimoghadam P. Ultrasound-guided hematoma block in distal radial fracture reduction: a randomised clinical trial. Emerg Med J. 2015;32:474-477.
  5. Reichman EF. Emergency Medicine Procedures. Second Edition. 2013:Chapter 125 Hematoma Blocks.
  6. Emiley P, Schreier S, Pryor P. Hematoma Blocks for Reduction of Distal Radius Fractures. Emergency Physicians Monthly. https://epmonthly.com/article/hematoma-blocks-for-reduction-of-distal-radius-fractures/. Accessed: September 14, 2019. Last updated: February 2017.
  7. Beaty JH and Kasser JR. Rockwood and Wilkins’ Fractures in Children. Chapter 3: Pain Relief and Related Concerns in Children’s Fractures, pp61-63.
  8. EM Cases and POCUS Toronto. POCUS Cases 4: Distal Radius Fracture. https://emergencymedicinecases.com/video/pocus-cases-4-distal-radius-fracture/. Accessed: September 14, 2019. Last updated: July 2018.
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Lung Ultrasound in the Evaluation of Pleural Infection

Lung Ultrasound in the Evaluation of Pleural Infection

Resident Clinical Pearl (RCP) July 2019

Yazan Ghanem PGY5 Internal Medicine, Dalhousie University

SJRHEM PoCUS Elective

 

Reviewed and edited by  Dr. David Lewis.

 


CASE: MR. WHITE

 

83 year old male with known past medical history of mild cognitive impairment (lives alone in assisted living). Two weeks prior to current presentation, he was admitted with community acquired pneumonia and discharged after 2 nights of hospital stay on oral antibiotics.

He is now presenting with 5 days history of worsening dyspnea, fever, fatigue and reduced oral intake. Vital signs are: Temperature 38.4 C; heart rate 80/min; Blood pressure 121/67; Respiratory rate 28/ minute; Oxygen saturation 90% on room air. His chest exam showed reduced air entry and dullness to percussion in the right hemithorax.

CXR:

 

Bedside POCUS:

 

Pleural fluid analysis:

•       WBC – 22,000 cells per uL

•       LDH – 1256 Units / L

•       Glc – 2.2 mmol / L

•       pH – 7.18

•       Gram Stain – Neg

 

Next steps in management?

 

A – 14 Fr pleural drain + Start IV Levofloxacin

 

B – 28 Fr pleural drain + Start Ceftriaxone / Azithromycin

 

C – 14 Fr pleural drain + Start Piperacillin – Tazobactam

 

D – Start Ceftriaxone / Azithromycin + Repeat CXR in 1 week

 

 

(See end of page for answer )

 


 

Normal Thoracic Ultrasound:

Thoracic Ultrasound is limited by bony structures (ribs and scapulae) as well as by air within lungs (poor conductor of sound waves).

With the transducer held in the longitudinal plane:

1 –     Ribs are visualized as repeating curvilinear structures with a posterior acoustic shadow.

2 –     Overlying muscle and fascia are seen as linear shadows with soft tissue with soft tissue echogenicity.

3 –     Parietal and visceral pleura is visualized as a single echogenic line no more than 2 mm in width which “slides” or “glides” beneath the ribs with respiration. Two separate lines can be seen with a high frequency transducer.

4 –     Normal aerated lung blocks progression of sound waves and is characterized by haphazard snowstorm appearance caused by reverberation artifact.

5 –     Diaphragms are bright curvilinear structures which move with respiration. Liver and spleen have a characteristic appearance below the right and left hemi diaphragms respectively.

 

 


Pleural Effusion:

Ultrasound has higher sensitivity in detecting pleural effusions than clinical examination and chest X-Ray.

On Ultrasound, pleural effusions appear as an anechoic or hypoechoic area between the visceral and parietal pleura that changes in shape with respiration. Atelectatic lung tissue appear in the far field as flapping or swaying “tongue-like” echodensities.

Ultrasound morphology:

1-     Anechoic Effusion: Totally echo-free (Could be transudative or exudative)

2-     Complex Non-septated: Echogenic appearing densities present (fibrinous debris). Always exudative.

3-     Complex Septated: Septa appear in fluid. Always exudative.

 

 


Parapneumonic Effusions and Empyema:

Ultrasound is superior to CT in demonstrating septae in the pleural space. However, CT is recommended for evaluation of complex pleuro-parenchymal disease and loculated pleural collections if drainage is planned: There is no correlation between ultrasound appearance and the presence of pus or need for surgical drainage; however, the presence of a septated appearing parapneumonic effusion correlate with poorer outcomes (longer hospital stay, longer chest tube drainage, higher likelihood for need for fibrinolytic therapy and surgical intervention.

Parapneumonic effusions appear as hyperechoic (with or without septae) on ultrasound.

 


Pulmonary Consolidation:

Pulmonary consolidation is sonographically visible in the presence of a pleural effusion that acts as an acoustic window or if directly abutting the pleura.

It appears as a wedge-shaped irregular echogenic area with air or fluid bronchograms.

 


 

Back to Mr. White

 

Next steps in management?

 

A – 14 Fr pleural drain + Start IV Levofloxacin

 

B – 28 Fr pleural drain + Start Ceftriaxone / Azithromycin

 

C –14 Fr pleural drain + Start Pipercillin- Tazobactam

 

D – Start Ceftriaxone / Azithromycin + Repeat CXR in 1 week

 

Rationale:

Complicated parapneumonic effusions should be managed with drainage and antibiotics that will treat anaerobic infection. An alternative would be a combination of Ceftriaxone and Metronidazole (No pseudomonas coverage). Levofloxacin alone does not add any anaerobic coverage. Azithromycin has poor penetration into loculated pleural collections.

 


 References

 

British Thoracic Society – Pleural Disease Guideline – 2010

https://thorax.bmj.com/content/65/8/667

 

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A focus on PoCUS – A reflection on the value of a PoCUS elective as a medical student

Medical Student PoCUS Elective Reflection

Nick Sajko

Class 2019 Dalhousie Medicine

@saj_ko

 

Nick Sajko, reflects on his experience after completing the SJRHEM PoCUS Elective. Nick is now a PGY1 in Emergency Medicine at the University of Alberta.


 

When my fourth and final year of medical school came around, I was at a crossroads: What did I want to do for the rest of my life? As many will attest, this question influences the choices you make in your clerkship years, especially in deciding on fourth year electives. I was ironically unfortunate in the fact that I had a broad range of interests in a system that does not always benefit those in my situation. I chose electives in Emergency Medicine, Internal Medicine, and Family Medicine – all of them providing valuable learning opportunities and a chance to hone my skills as a junior clinician. However, these “classic” or “bread and butter” electives paled in comparison to the experiences I obtained through my Point of Care Ultrasound (PoCUS) elective at SJRH – a unique elective opportunity relevant to any medical trainee.

 

It is my hope that this reflection piece will provide insight into those deciding on their elective choices and convince some of you to choose a few electives that are off the beat and path and unique. In particular, an elective in the field of PoCUS – a tool that is more useful than some may consider.

 


 

What does a PoCUS elective at SJRH entail? What can I expect?

 

My elective consisted of regularly scheduled shifts within the Emergency Department, paired with senior staff who have specialized training in PoCUS. During these shifts, I would see patients as if I was conducting a bread and butter Emergency Medicine elective, however, cases would be chosen based on the potential for ultrasound practice. This allowed me to gain a remarkable appreciation for the breadth of PoCUS applications within the primary care setting, while also allowing me to gain extremely valuable hands on time with ultrasound in a supervised setting.

 

In addition to the above, I was provided with numerous resources so as to allow for self-directed learning. One of the most valuable resources provided was the opportunity to use the SJRH EM state-of-the-art PoCUS simulator – an invaluable tool for any level of PoCUS experience. Closer to the end of this elective experience, I was offered opportunities to write PoCUS focused case-reports, as well as undergo PoCUS competency exams to solidify my skills within this setting.

The skills I learned in this elective carried forward with me into my various other electives, and provided me with a unique skill-set as a junior learner. Whether it was doing point of care ECHO in my cardiology elective, FAST scans during trauma-codes in my other Emergency Medicine electives, or assessing volume status in complex general internal medicine patients, my competency in these PoCUS applications definitely impressed both residents and staff alike during my fourth year!

 


Why is PoCUS relevant to me as a medical student wanting to specialize in: (insert hyper-specific / niche specialty here)

One question many people may have at this point is, “why would I do this if I wasn’t interested in Emergency Medicine?”. PoCUS is a constantly evolving field, with new and innovative applications being seen in clinical practice constantly. With this, PoCUS can play a huge role in many different specialties: Internal Medicine physicians use PoCUS to provide support to presumed diagnoses and perform certain procedures (such as placing central lines), while surgeons can utilize PoCUS in the examination of traumas, as well as to support diagnoses in the pre- and post-operative patient. PoCUS is steadily becoming a sought after skill in most of the medical and surgical specialties, where proficiency in its use and interpretation can set you apart from other trainees, and more importantly, add to the competency of your patient care!

The value of having this elective through the Emergency Department allows for students to test their skills in the undifferentiated patient – something that will provide learners with enhanced deduction and reasoning skills, no matter what specialty they are interested in. It also allows learners to have access to a huge pool of patients, with a wide breadth of medical problems, thus optimizing this unique elective’s value.

 


 

Is choosing a “unique”, “niche”, or “extra-focused” elective, such as PoCUS, detrimental to my CaRMS application?

Fourth year electives and CaRMS amalgamate into a cruel and unusual game – while most medical school staff and administrators will tell you that your fourth year electives are to be used to “try new things”, this is often not the reality. With the competitiveness of specialties on a constant upward trend, more and more learners choose to conduct the majority of their electives in the single specialty they are interested in. This is great for those who are certain about the field they want to practice in, but creates a predicament for those of us who want to explore a number of options before making a decision.

As I mentioned above, I was in the latter group – with interests spanning 3 different specialties, including some very competitive ones. I chose to go against the grain, so to speak, and opted to conduct a variety of electives in different specialties – including some niche electives in things such as PoCUS. Not only were these opportunities fantastic from a learning point of view, I would argue that they allowed me to stand out amongst a sea of similar applicants and provided me with a unique skill set – something that I think most programs will find enticing! But most importantly, they were fun, exciting, and allowed me to experience my fourth year of medical school the way its advertised.

For those that know their specialty of choice, I would provide the same advice – use this year to experience new things and create a unique learning identity that will set you apart from the rest.

 


 

After all the worry and panic with my elective choices, feeling like I wasn’t committed enough to one specific specialty, I ended up matching to my first-choice field and location. I think this is in large part due to the fact that I was well-rounded in my experiences and had taken the chance to explore unique learning opportunities through this fantastic elective at SJRH. The staff, the environment, and the resources that come with the PoCUS elective at SJRH EM are second to none – I am confident in saying that this elective was the most beneficial and enjoyable component to my fourth year training. Hopefully my thoughts and reflections on this experience will allow some of you to follow a similar path.

 

Nicholas Sajko, B.Sc, MD

Emergency Medicine PGY1

University of Alberta

 


 

Click here for more information on the SJRHEM PoCUS Electives and Fellowships

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EM Reflections – June 2019 – Part 1

Thanks to Dr. Joanna Middleton for leading the discussions this month

Edited by Dr David Lewis 


Discussion Topics

  1. When is a pregnancy not a pregnancy?
  2. Caustic Ingestions
  3. Transient Ischemic Attack – Emergency Medicine (see part 2)

When is a pregnancy not a pregnancy?

Molar Pregnancy

Hydatidiform mole (molar pregnancy) is a relatively rare complication of fertilization with an incidence in the United States of 0.63 to 1.1 per 1000 pregnancies, although rates vary geographically. It is included in the spectrum of gestational trophoblastic diseases and is comprised of both complete molar pregnancies (CM) and partial molar pregnancies (PM).

The most well characterized risk factor for CM is extreme of maternal age. Maternal ages less than 20 or greater than 40 years have been associated with relative risks for CM as high as 10- and 11-fold greater respectively. Other potential risk factors include oral contraceptive use, maternal type A or AB blood groups, maternal smoking, and maternal alcohol abuse.

Molar pregnancy typically presents in the first trimester and may be associated with a wide array of findings, including vaginal bleeding (most common), uterine size larger than expected according to pregnancy date (CM), uterine size smaller than expected according to pregnancy date (PM), excessive beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hcg) levels, anemia, hyperemesis gravidum, theca lutein cysts, pre-eclampsia, and respiratory distress.Studies comparing modern clinical presentations of CM with historical presentations have demonstrated a significant reduction in many of the classic presenting signs and symptoms such as vaginal bleeding and excessive uterine size. This reduction is attributed to early detection by transvaginal ultrasound and increasingly sensitive β-hcg assays. Numerous studies evaluating the efficacy of ultrasound in detecting molar pregnancy demonstrate a 57–95 percent sensitivity for the detection of CM compared to only 18–49 percent sensitivity for PM.

More here: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2791738/

PoCUS – Normal Early Pregnancy

Arrow = Yolk sac (YS) within Gestational sac (GS), note the hyperechoic decidual reaction surrounding GS, Arrow head = Fetal Pole

PoCUS – Molar Pregnancy

 

PoCUS SIgns:

  • enlarged uterus
  • may be seen as an intrauterine mass with cystic spaces without any associated fetal parts
    • the multiple cystic structures classically give a “snow storm” or “bunch of grapes” type appearance.
  • may be difficult to diagnose in the first trimester 6
    • may appear similar to a normal pregnancy or as an empty gestational sac
    • <50% are diagnosed in the first trimester
  • More on Radiopedia.org

Useful post from County EM blog- click here

 


Caustic Ingestions

 

 

Hydrochloric Acid – pH 1-2

Dangerous if pH <2 or >11.5-12

For alkaline – higher percent, shorter time to burn – 10%NaOH – 1 min of contact to produce deep burn, 30% within seconds

 

Acid – painful to swallow so usually less volume, bad taste so more gagging/laryngeal injury, more aqueous so less esophageal injury, pylorospasm prevents entry into duodenum producing stagnation and prominent antrum injury.  Food is protective.  Acid ingestion typically produces a superficial coagulation necrosis that thromboses the underlying mucosal blood vessels and consolidates the connective tissue, thereby forming a protective eschar.  In enough amount – perforation.

Alkali – burns esophagus more, neutralized in stomach.  Liquefaction necrosis.

Management

Decontamination: Activated charcoal / GI decontamination / neutralisation procedures are contraindicated

Obtaining meaningful info from endoscopy after treatment with charcoal is very difficult

If asymptomatic – observe, trial of oral intake at 4 hours after exposure, earlier if low suspicion or likely benign ingestion after discussion with Poisons Centre

Symptomatic patients or those with a significant ingestion

(high-concentration acid or alkali or high volume [>200 ml] of a low-concentration acid or alkali)

Upper GI endoscopy should be performed early (3 to 48 hrs) and preferably during the first 24 hrs after ingestion to evaluate extent of esophageal and gastric damage and guide management.  Endoscopy is contraindicated in patients who have evidence of GI perforation. (Ingestion of >60 mL of concentrated HCl leads to severe injury to the GI tract with necrosis and perforation, rapid onset of MODS and is usually fatal – endoscopy within 24 hours (unless asymptomatic at 4 hours)

Complications – 1/3 develop strictures – directly related to depth/severity of injury, years later

 


 

TAKE HOME POINTS

  1. PV Bleed, Hyperemesis, PoCUS = bunch Grapes or Snowstorm – consider Molar Pregnancy
  2. Don’t use Activated Charcoal for Caustic Ingestions
  3. Discuss Caustic Ingestions with Poisons Centre
  4. Consider early endoscopy
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SHoC Network – Sonography in Hypotension and Cardiac-Arrest

The Sonography in Hypotension and Cardiac-Arrest (SHoC) Network is an international group of clinicians and researchers committed to advancing the evidence around the use of Point of Care Ultrasound (PoCUS) in critically ill patients.

The group evolved from a research network established by the International Federation for Emergency Medicine (IFEM) Ultrasound Interest Group, involving several PoCUS leaders from several international emergency medicine organizations.

The SHoC Network has been instrumental in initiating several research projects, as well as producing clinical guidelines. Further details are shown below.

Publications

The SHoC-ED study 2018 (SHoC-ED1) Link  Download

The SHoC systematic review of PoCUS in cardiac arrest Link  Download

The IFEM SHoC Consensus guidelines Link  Download

The SHoC-ED3 study – PoCUS vs No PoCUS in cardiac arrest Link  Download

The SHoC-ED-ECG study – does ECG predict cardiac activity? Link  Download

The initial SHoC study – clinical basis for protocol development Link  Download

Current Projects

The SHoC-ED2 study – PoCUS and ECG in cardiac arrest

The SHoC systematic review of PoCUS in hypotension

IFEM Documents and links

SHoC Guidelines link

IFEM PoCUS curriculum link

Network members and contributors include:

Paul Atkinson (Chair; 1,2,3),
David Lewis (1,2,3),
James Milne (4), 
Hein Lamprecht (5),
Jacqueline Fraser (1),
James French (1,2,3),
Laura Diegelmann (5,6),  
Chau Pham (7),
Melanie Stander (5),
David Lussier (7),
Ryan Henneberry (8),  
Michael Howlett (1,2,3),
Jay Mekwan (1,2,3),
Brian Ramrattan (1,2,3) ,
Joanna Middleton (1,2,3),
Niel van Hoving (5),  
Mandy Peach (1),
Luke Taylor (1),  
Tara Dahn (8),
Sean Hurley (8),
K. MacSween (8),
Lucas Richardson (8),  
George Stoica (9),
Samuel Hunter (10),
Paul Olszynski (11),
Nicole Beckett (12),
Elizabeth Lalande (13),
Talia Burwash-Brennan (14), K. Burns (15),
Michael Lambert (15),
Bob Jarman (16),
Jim Connolly (16),
Ankona Banerjee(1),
Michael Woo (14),
Beatrice Hoffmann (17),
Brett Nelson (18),
Vicki Noble (19)
1.     Department of Emergency Medicine, Dalhousie University, Saint John Regional Hospital, Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada
2.     Dalhousie Medicine New Brunswick, Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada
3.     Emergency Medicine, Memorial University, NL, Canada
4.     Family Medicine, Fraser Health Authority, Vancouver, BC, Canada
5.     Division of Emergency Medicine, University of Stellenbosch, Cape Town, South Africa
6.    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, USA
7.    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Manitoba, Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
8.     Department of Emergency Medicine, Dalhousie University, QEII, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
9.    Research Services, Horizon Health Network, Saint John Regional
Hospital, Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada
10. Faculty of Science, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
11. Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon, SK, Canada
12. Department of Internal Medicine, Dalhousie University, Saint John
Regional Hospital, Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada
13. Department of Emergency Medicine, Université Laval, Québec, Québec, Canada
14. Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Ottawa, Canada
15. Department of Emergency Medicine, Advocate Christ Medical Center, Oak Lawn, IL, USA
16. Department of Emergency Medicine, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
17. Department of Emergency Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, USA
18. Department of Emergency Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, The Mount Sinai Hospital, USA
19. Department of Emergency Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, University Hospital Cleveland Medical Center, USA
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PoCUS – Dilated Aortic Root

Medical Student Clinical Pearl

James Kiberd

Class 2019 Dalhousie Medicine

Reviewed and Edited by Dr. David Lewis


Case:

A 66 year-old female presented to the Emergency Department with shortness of breath and back pain. She had a known dilated aortic root, which was being followed with repeat CT scans. Given the nature of her presenting complaint, a PoCUS was performed to assess her aorta.

 

 

 

Long Axis Parasternal View:

PoCUS for Cardiac imaging has been studied in the acute care setting; focusing on the assessment for pericardial effusion, chamber size, global cardiac function, and volume status, and cardiac arrest.1

In the setting of acute aortic dissection, further evaluation is often recommended depending on the practitioner’s skill level.2 There have been case reports where ultrasound has been used to assess both Type A and Type B aortic dissections.3–5

In order to assess the aortic root, have the patient in a supine position. Either the phased array or the curvilinear probe can be used depending on examiner’s preference. The probe should be positioned with the marker towards the patient’s right shoulder on the anterior chest to the left of the patient’s lower left sternal border. By tilting the transducer between the left shoulder and right hip, long axis views are obtained at different levels with the goal of identifying four main structures; the aorta, the left atrium, and the right and left ventricles. The parasternal long axis view of our patient is shown in Figure 1, where her aortic root measured 3.83cm.

 

Figure 1: Parasternal Long Axis View of Heart: Patient’s root diameter was found to be 3.83cm.

More generally, this view can be used to assess left ventricular contractility and the presence of pericardial effusion, which were not present in this patient. She went on to have a confirmatory CT scan where her aortic root was found to be unchanged from her last scan and was 3.8 cm in diameter as assessed by PoCUS.

In Summary:

Although not rigorously studied to assess aortic root dilatation at the bedside, we present a case where PoCUS was reliable in the assessment of the aortic root. There have been other cases of aortic dissection identified by ultrasound in the emergency department setting, however confirmatory studies (either CT scan or formal echocardiography) are still recommended.


References:

  1. Labovitz AJ, Noble VE, Bierig M, et al. Focused cardiac ultrasound in the emergent setting: A consensus statement of the American society of Echocardiography and American College of Emergency Physicians. J Am Soc Echocardiogr. 2010;23(12):1225-1230. doi:10.1016/j.echo.2010.10.005.
  2. Andrus P, Dean A. Focused cardiac ultrasound. Glob Heart. 2013;8(4):299-303. doi:10.1016/j.gheart.2013.12.003.
  3. Perkins AM, Liteplo A, Noble VE. Ultrasound Diagnosis of Type A Aortic Dissection. J Emerg Med. 2010;38(4):490-493. doi:10.1016/j.jemermed.2008.05.013.
  4. Bernett J, Strony R. Diagnosing acute aortic dissection with aneurysmal degeneration with point of care ultrasound. Am J Emerg Med. 2017;35(9):1384.e3-1384.e4. doi:10.1016/j.ajem.2017.05.052.
  5. Kaban J, Raio C. Emergency department diagnosis of aortic dissection by bedside transabdominal ultrasound. Acad Emerg Med. 2009;16(8):809-810. doi:10.1111/j.1553-2712.2009.00448.x.
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PoCUS – Pleural Effusion

Medical Student Clinical Pearl

James Kiberd

Class 2019 Dalhousie Medicine

Reviewed and Edited by Dr. David Lewis


Case: 

A 90 year-old male presented with worsening shortness of breath on exertion, crackles bilaterally at the bases on auscultation with known history of congestive heart failure. Bedside ultrasound was performed to assess for pleural effusion

Lung Views:

In order to perform ultrasound of the lungs, there are four views that are obtained (see Figure 1). Place the patient supine. The high frequency linear array transducer is often used, but either the phased array or curvilinear transducers can be used. The first views are taken at both right and left mid-clavicular lines of the anterior chest. With the marker of the transducer pointed toward the patient’s head, a minimum of 3-4 rib spaces should be identified. The next views are of the posterior-lateral chest. The patient can be supine or in the sitting position. It is these views where a pleural effusion can be identified.

Figure 1: Chest views with ultrasound. ‘A’ are anterior chest view positions and ‘B’ are posterolateral view positions

Pleural Effusion

Pleural effusion is assessed by ultrasound placing the transducer in the midaxillary line with the marker oriented toward the patient’s head. On the patient’s right side the diaphragm, the liver, and the vertebral line can be seen. On the left, the diaphragm, spleen, and vertebral line should be in view. In a patient without pleural effusion, one should not be able to visualize the lung as it is mostly air and scatters the sound produced by the transducer. However, in the presence of pleural effusion, the area above the diaphragm is filled with fluid and therefore will appear anechoic. In addition, the vertebral line will be present past the diaphragm as the fluid allows the sound waves to propagate and not scatter. This is known as the ‘spine sign’ (also known as the ‘V-line’). Finally, one is often able to see the atelectatic lung float and move with respirations in the fluid, this is known as the ‘sinusoid sign.’ These are the three criteria outlined by consensus statements in the identification of pleural effusions.1 Occasionally, the area above the diaphragm may look like spleen or liver, but this is known as ‘mirror image’ artifact and is normal.2 Figure 2 shows both the right and left views of our patient.

Figure 2: Pleural effusion showing anechoic pleural fluid, atelectatic lung, and ‘spine sign

Accuracy with Ultrasound

Ultrasound is more accurate than either chest x-ray or physical exam in the identification of small pleural effusions.3 For a chest x-ray to identify fluid there usually needs to be more than 200cc present.2 A meta-analysis found that ultrasound had a mean sensitivity of 93% (95%CI: 89-96%) and specificity of 96% (95%CI: 95-98%).4

 

Our patient went on to have a chest x-ray where he was found to have bilateral pleural effusions (see Figure 3).

Figure 3: Bilateral pleural effusions seen on chest radiography in our patient.

In Summary

Three criteria are used to identify pleural effusion on ultrasound; anechoic fluid above the diaphragm, the ability to visualize the spine above the diaphragm (‘spine sign’), and atelectatic lung moving with respirations (‘sinusoid sign’). Lung ultrasound for the detection of pleural effusion is more reliable to identify small effusions in comparison to both radiography and physical exam.


References:

  1. Volpicelli G, Elbarbary M, Blaivas M, et al. International evidence-based recommendations for point-of-care lung ultrasound. Intensive Care Med. 2012;38(4):577-591. doi:10.1007/s00134-012-2513-4.
  2. Liu RB, Donroe JH, McNamara RL, Forman HP, Moore CL. The practice and implications of finding fluid during point-of-care ultrasonography: A review. JAMA Intern Med. 2017;177(12):1818-1825. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.5048.
  3. Wong CL, Holroyd-leduc J, Straus SE. CLINICIAN ’ S CORNER Does This Patient Have a Pleural Effusion ? PATIENT SCENARIO. Jama. 2010;301(3):309-317. doi:10.1001/jama.2008.937.
  4. Grimberg AI, Carlos Shigueoka DI, Nagib Atallah III Á, et al. Diagnostic accuracy of sonography for pleural effusion: systematic review Acurácia diagnóstica da ultrassonografia nos derrames pleurais: revisão sistemática
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PoCUS Triage Shoulder Dislocation

Resident Clinical Pearl – POCUS in Shoulder Dislocation

Luke Richardson, PGY 3 Emergency Medicine, Dalhousie University, Saint John, New Brunswick

Reviewed by Dr. David Lewis

 

A 24 year old male rugby player presents to the emergency department with left sided shoulder pain.  He reports being hit in the middle of the game followed by a pop to his shoulder.  Since that time he has had ongoing pain and limited movement.  His vitals are normal but he appears uncomfortable.  He shows no signs of neurological or vascular injury.  History and physical exam is otherwise benign.

 

Dislocated shoulder is suspected, but is there a way to quickly diagnose prior to x-ray and therefore expedite administration of pre-procedural analgesia and preparation of procedural team and room?

 

POCUS: Shoulder Background

The shoulder is a ball-in-socket joint with a large range of motion and has a high risk of dislocation due to its shallow joint depth and limited tendinous support inferiorly.   Most commonly, the shoulder will dislocate with the humeral head anterior to the glenohumeral rim due to an superiorly placed force upon the humeral head.  Posterior dislocations are less common and commonly due to higher mechanism of injuries such as seizure or electrical shock.

 

Diagnosis of shoulder dislocation is commonly made by x-ray but this method has its downsides including time to diagnosis and increased radiation exposure.  An important consideration is the use of POCUS during shoulder reduction.  This technique allows for real time confirmation and potentially avoids the need for repeat sedation if failed reduction discovered by a trip to the x-ray department.  A recent prospective observational study of 73 patients in the emergency department revealed an accuracy of 100% sensitivity and specificity for shoulder dislocation and relocation (reference 1).   Finally, considering there is increased risk of neuro-vascular complications with time to relocation; a decrease in duration to diagnosis could potentially improve patient care.

 

 

POCUS: Shoulder Technique

Get patient to sit up to allow availability to the posterior portion of the patient shoulder.

Support the patients elbow while positioning the shoulder in adduction and internal rotation.

Using the curvilinear probe, landmark just inferior to the scapular spine and follow it laterally until you find the glenoid (G) and humeral head (HH) (Shol1).

Shol 1

You should find the humeral head (HH) as a circular structure lateral to the glenoid fossa (G) if in joint. Note the Glenoid labrum (L).

To confirm, you can internally and externally rotate the arm and visualize the humeral head freely moving within the glenoid (Shol2/Shol4) (reference 2). Note the overlying deltoid (most superficial) and the infraspinatus tendon that becomes more apparent during internal rotation.

Shol2

Shol4

If the shoulder is anteriorly dislocated you will see the humeral head displaced inferiorly (Shol5/Shol6) (reference 2,3)

If the shoulder is posteriorly dislocated you will see the humeral head more superficial than expected (Shol5) (reference 2,3)

 

Shol5

Shol6

 

Conclusion:

POCUS is an easily available and non-invasive tool in the emergency department.  It can be used in cases such as this to improve patient flow, decrease time to diagnosis, and confirm reduction.

 

Reference:

  1. Abbasi, S., Molaie, H., Hafezimoghadam, P., Amin Zare, M., Abbasi, M., Rezai, M., Farsi, D. Diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonogrpahic examination in the management of shoulder dislocation in the emergency department. Annals of Emergency Medicine. Volume 62:2. August, 2013, pg. 170-175.
  2. Tin, J., Simmons, C., Ditkowsky, J., Alerhand, S., Singh,M., US Probe: ultrasound for shoulder dislocation and reduction. EMDocs http://www.emdocs.net/us-probe-ultrasound-for-shoulder-dislocation-and-reduction/ January 18, 2018.
  3. Rich, C., Wu, S., Ye, T., Liebmann, O. Pocus: shoulder dislocation. Brown Emergency Medicine. http://brownemblog.com/blog-1/2016/11/30/pocus-shoulder-dislocation. November 30th, 2016.
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Fall ECCU Fest 2018 – PoCUS Conference Workshop and ECCU2 Course

September 27th – 28th 2018

The Algonquin Resort in St. Andrews by-the-Sea, New Brunswick, Canada

Atlantic Canada’s top PoCUS event

UPDATE

 

Now open for applications/booking – Only a few places still available

 

The ECCU Conference is being held in conjunction with the ECCU2 Advanced Applications Course in order to provide those attending the course and other delegates with an opportunity to access an update in the hottest clinical PoCUS topics. The focus will be on presenting the best emerging evidence, strategies for developing a local PoCUS program and developing competencies.

Includes:

  • International PoCUS experts
  • Clinical PoCUS hot topics and updates
  • Top PoCUS research
  • IP2 Diagnostic stream lectures

Conference delegates will have access to the Diagnostic stream lectures of the ECCU2 Advanced Applications Course, which will include an Gallbladder, Renal, DVT and Ocular

Invited Faculty – 2018

Dr. Hein Lamprecht – South Africa – (ECCU Fest 2018) – PoCUS Educator Extraordinaire – IFEM – WinFocus

Dr. Peter Croft – USA – (ECCU Fest 2018) – New England PoCUS disrupter –past MGH PoCUS Fellow

Dr. David Mackenzie – USA – (ECCU Fest 2018) – Canadian New Englander, PoCUS innovator – past MGH PoCUS Fellow

 

Also our top Dalhousie Faculty of PoCUS Experts

 


 

Open for applications and booking: More Information Here

 

There are only 2 places left on the 2 day Advanced Apps ECCU 2 course, however we still have good availability for the 1 day conference workshop

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