Tardive Dyskinesia in an Emergency Setting

Medical Student Clinical Pearl (RCP) – October 2019

Faith Moore

Faculty of Medicine
Dalhousie University
CC3
Class of 2021

Reviewed and Edited by Dr. David Lewis



Case

A 48-year-old female was brought to the emergency department by EMS after developing dystonia that morning, a couple hours earlier, following a restless night. The dystonia had begun affecting her arms, torso and buccal region, but eventually moved to also involve her legs. She had a history of recurrent tardive dyskinesia for the past 20 years since taking stelazine and developing tardive dystonia. She was switched to olanzopine after developing dystonia and stayed on it until two months ago. Her citalopram and clozapam dosing had been increased two weeks ago, and she had also started Gingko biloba extract two weeks ago. She had started Nuplazid 3 days ago.

Upon exam she was diaphoretic with no other abnormal findings other than dystonia affecting the entire body.


Tardive Dyskinesia

Pathophysiology

    • Tardive dyskinesia is a hyperkinetic movement disorder that is associated with the use of dopamine receptor-blocking medications.1 The exact mechanism is under debate, but the main hypotheses include an exaggerated response by dopamine receptors due to a chronic dopamine blockade, oxidative stress, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) depletion, cholinergic deficiency, altered synaptic plasticity, neurotoxicity and defective neuroadaptive signaling. 2 The most accepted theory of the mechanism is that the chronic dopamine blockade caused by the dopamine receptor-blocking medications results in a hypersensitivity of the receptors, specifically at the basal ganglia. 1
    • The medications that are known to have the possibility to cause tardive dyskinesia include antipsychotic drugs, anticholinergic agents (ex. Procyclidine), antidepressants, antiemetics (ex. Metoclopramide), anticonvulsants, antihistamines, decongestants (ex. pseudoephedrine and phenylephrine), antimalarials, antiparkinson agents, anxiolytics, biogenic amines, mood stabilizers and stimulants.1

Who is most at risk?

    • The medications that are the most common culprits are first- and second-generation antipsychotics and metoclopramide. The incidence of tardive dyskinesia from chronic first-generation antipsychotic exposure is 5-6% 3, and is 4% for second generation antipsychotics 4. There is no prospective research on chronic metoclopramide use and the risk for tardive dyskinesia at this point and time5, but a study in the UK in 1985 showed 1 case of tardive dyskinesia for every 35 000 prescriptions6.
      • Most prominent risk factors
        • Old age5
        • Chronic exposure5
        • Patients who develop extrapyramidal symptoms while on antipsychotic drugs.7

Signs and Symptoms

      • Repetitive involuntary body movements that may involve the face, tongue, eyes, arms, torso and legs

Diagnosis

    • The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) classifies tardive dyskinesia as “involuntary movements (lasting at least a few weeks) generally of the tongue, lower face and jaw, and extremities (but sometimes involving the pharyngeal, diaphragmatic, or trunk muscles), developing in association with the use of a neuroleptic medication for at least a few months” and that persists for at least one month after the medication is stopped.8

Differential Diagnosis

    • Acute dyskinesia
    • Akathisia
    • Parkinsonism and tremor
    • Perioral tremor
    • Stereotypies and mannerisms
    • Spontaneous or idiopathic dyskinesias
    • Isolated dystonia
    • Primary movement disorders
    • Chorea from systemic causes 9

Key Questions for History and Physical

    • Are the movements voluntary?
    • Is there an accompanied feeling of restlessness?
      • If yes, might point towards akathisia.
    • When did these movements began?
    • What is the body distribution of the involuntary movements?
    • Are there any extrapyramidal signs and symptoms?
    • Are there any associated features?
    • Have there been any drug changes in the past few months?

 

Management in the Emergency Department

    • First line treatment of tardive dyskinesia generally begins with discontinuation of the offending drug. In the emergency department this should be done after consulting with the treating physician. These patients are often being treated for psychiatric disorder and the treatment of the psychiatric disorder must be balanced with the risk of tardive dyskinesia. It may be appropriate to switch from a first generation antipsychotic medication to a second generation antipsychotic generation medication.
    • If the symptoms of tardive dyskinesia need to be treated, like in our case with this patient, there are various drugs that can be tried.
    • Tetrabenazine is considered first line.10
      • Suggested doses of 12.5-25 mg starting daily dose with a 25-200 mg/day dose range.10
    • Other treatment options
      • Dextromethorphan11
        • In a recent case study patients took under 1mg/kg, not exceeding 42 mg/day.11
        • This was recommended by a local neurologist here at the Saint John Regional Hospital.
      • Valbenazine 12
        • Suggested dose of 40 mg UID, increasing to 80 mg UID after one week.12
      • Amantadine10
        • Suggested dose of 100 mg starting daily dose with a dose range of 100-300 mg/day 10
      • Benzodiazepines12
        • Clonazepam initiated at 0.5 mg and titrated by 0.5 mg increments every 5 days to response up to a maximum dose of 3-4 mg/day. 12
      • Diphenhydramine suggested dose of 25-50 mg IV13
      • Botulinum toxin injections12
    • Commonly used treatments lacking evidence of efficacy
      • Benztropine10

Drug Starting Dose Recommendations Dose Range
1st Line
Tetrabenazine 12.5-25 mg UID 25-200 mg UID
Other options
Dextromethorphan Under 1 mg/kg Not exceeding 42 mg UID
Valbenazine 40 mg UID Increase to 80 mg after 1 week
Amantadine 100 mg UID 100-300 mg UID
Clonazepam 0.5 mg 0.5-4.0 mg UID
Diphenhydramine 25 mg IV 25-50 mg IV
Botulinum toxin injection local injection to treat specific painful dystonia resistant to systemic therapy

 


Case Continued

The patient was given 2mg of Benztropine IV with no effect. Twenty minutes later he was then given 1mg of Ativan SL with no effect. Thirty minutes later the patient was given 150 mg Benadryl IV, and some improvement was then witnessed, the patient was allowed to sleep and was discharged approximately 5 hours after his arrival with no symptoms.


External Resources

Treatment strategies for dystonia

Diagnosis & Treatment of Dystonia


References

  1. Cornett EM, Novitch M, Kaye AD, Kata V, Kaye AM. Medication-Induced Tardive Dyskinesia: A Review and Update.Ochsner J. 2017 Summer;17(2):162-174. Review. PubMed PMID: 28638290; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5472076.
  2. Kulkarni SK, Naidu PS. Pathophysiology and drug therapy of tardive dyskinesia: current concepts and future perspectives.Drugs Today (Barc). 2003 Jan;39(1):19-49. Review. PubMed PMID: 12669107.
  3. Glazer WM.Review of incidence studies of tardive dyskinesia associated with typical antipsychotics. J Clin Psychiatry. 2000;61 Suppl 4:15-20.  PubMed PMID: 10739326.
  4. Correll CU, Schenk EM.Tardive dyskinesia and new antipsychotics. Curr Opin Psychiatry. 2008 Mar;21(2):151-6. doi: 10.1097/YCO.0b013e3282f53132.  PubMed PMID: 18332662.
  5. Rao AS, Camilleri M.Review article: metoclopramide and tardive dyskinesia.Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2010 Jan;31(1):11-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2036.2009.04189.x.  PubMed PMID: 19886950.
  6. Bateman DN, Rawlins MD, Simpson JM.Extrapyramidal reactions with metoclopramide. Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1985 Oct 5;291(6500):930-2. doi: 10.1136/bmj.291.6500.930. PubMed PMID: 3929968; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC1417247
  7. Novick D, Haro JM, Bertsch J, Haddad PM.Incidence of extrapyramidal symptoms and tardive dyskinesia in schizophrenia: thirty-six-month results from the European schizophrenia outpatient health outcomes study. J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2010 Oct;30(5):531-40. doi: 10.1097/JCP.0b013e3181f14098. PubMed PMID: 20814320.
  1. American Psychiatric Association, Medication-induced movement disorders and other adverse effects of medication, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition, American Psychiatric Association, 2013.
  2. Tarsy D, Deik A. Tardive dyskinesia: Etiology, risk factors, clinical features, and diagnosis. In: UpToDate, Eichler A (Ed), UpToDate, Waltham, MA. (Accessed on September 9, 2019.)
  1. DynaMed [Internet]. Ipswich (MA): EBSCO Information Services. 1995 – . Record No.T113751, Tardive Dyskinesia; [updated 2018 Nov 30, cited September 9, 2019]. Available from https://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T113751. Registration and login required.
  1. Kim J. (2014). Dextromethorphan for Tardive Dyskinesia. International Neuropsychiatric Disease Journal. 2. 136-140. 10.9734/INDJ/2014/7970.
  2. Tarsy D, Deik A. Tardive dyskinesia: Prevention, prognosis, and treatment. In: UpToDate, Eichler A (Ed), UpToDate, Waltham, MA. (Accessed on September 9, 2019.)
  1. Buttaravoli P, Leffler SM. Chapter 1 – dystonic drug reaction. 2012:1-3. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-323-07909-9.00001-5 “.
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Approach to Resuscitation in Severe Calcium Channel Blocker Poisoning

Medical Student Clinical Pearl

J.L. Dobson

Faculty of Medicine
Memorial University of Newfoundland
M.D. Candidate 2020

Reviewed and Edited by Dr. Luke Taylor and Dr. David Lewis

and Liam Walsh. Pharmacist HHN


 

Introduction:

Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) have multiple clinical uses, including the management of hypertension, angina, and cardiac arrhythmias. [1] While CCBs are no longer the most widely prescribed antihypertensive as they were in the 1990s, their prevalence remains high. [2] This along with the existence of both immediate release and long-acting forms poses a challenge for the Emergency Physician faced with a case of CCB poisoning.

Physiology:

Myocardium in the sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodes uses the slow action potential created by calcium currents to conduct. CCBs act on this tissue by inhibiting this current, thus slowing conduction through the SA and AV nodes. This results in a decreased heart rate, prolonged PR intervals, and lengthened refractory periods through the AV node. Conversely, they also inhibit calcium flow in smooth muscle, resulting in coronary and peripheral artery dilation. This ultimately provides the mechanism for reflex tachycardia, increased AV conduction, and improved myocardial contractility. [3]

Adverse reactions to the physiological effects of CCBs include vasodilatory effects (peripheral edema, headache, palpitations), gastrointestinal effects (nausea, diarrhea, constipation), and negative inotropic effects (hypotension, bradycardia). [4]


 

Case Report:

A 80-year-old male is brought in to Trauma by ambulance with hypotension, bradycardia, and an altered level of consciousness. Report from EMS reveals the patient called about half an hour prior stating that he had taken medications in an attempt to commit suicide. Upon arrival, the pt was alert and oriented, and endorsed taking an unknown quantity of clonazepam and citalopram, and a deficit of up to four grams of Diltiazem was noted from his medications. He denied further substance use. Though initially stable, the patient deteriorated rapidly upon arrival to the emergency department.

In the Emergency Department, initial vitals revealed a BP of 88/68, P of 52 bpm and SPO2 of 93% on RA and a BG of 15. As such nasal prongs were placed and she was immediately given atropine as well as push dose epinephrine. Within ten minutes, there was further decline in mental status of the patient corresponding to a blood pressure of 83/61 and a heart rate persisting in the low 40s bpm. He was successively given further epinephrine, atropine and calcium chloride while toxicology was contacted. Despite recurrent doses of epinephrine and atropine, the patient remained profoundly hypotensive and bradycardic. Insulin (Humulin R) and dextrose were started at 0.5U/kg/hr with a 1U/kg bolus. This infusion was titrated up every thirty minutes with minimal improvement in vitals. At this point, remaining bradycardic at 37bpm, intralipid therapy was deemed necessary and so a bolus of 105mL was given. Having received epinephrine bolus along with a 0.2mcg/kg/hr infusion, maximum dose of atropine, 3g of Calcium chloride, with minimal clinical improvement cardiac pacing was initiated. Once good electrical and mechanical capture were achieved the patient underwent and RSI with ketamine and rocuronium. Once stabilized, he was transferred to ICU for further management. In ICU, the patient had a transvenous pacemaker floated successfully followed by a transitioning off the epinephrine to norepinephrine and vasopressin. Intralipid infusion was started and the insulin and glucose therapy was titrated up to a maximum of 4U/kg/hr. The patient unfortunately did not tolerate whole bowel irrigation. Despite the critical nature of their condition, the patient did slowly improve and pressors were weaned.


 

Discussion:

History & Primary Survey

This patient experienced negative inotropic effects of the extended release calcium channel blocker, resulting in cardiogenic shock. Ingestion of more than 5-10 times the usual dose of CCB results in severe intoxication: this patient was thought to have consumed four grams of Diltiazem, over eleven times the maximum recommended dose. [5] While any CCB can result in hypotension, knowledge of which CCB was taken is useful to set expectations for the patient’s progression: unlike dihydropyridine-type CCBs which would more likely present with reflex tachycardia, non-dihydropyridine CCBs like verapamil and diltiazem result in bradycardia. [6] Another crucial point in the primary survey is that, due to the neuroprotective effects of CCBs, mental status may initially be preserved until cerebral perfusion is severely affected. [5]

Initial Resuscitation

While the patient may initially be able to maintain their airway, mental status and vitals may deteriorate rapidly. [5] It is important to note that like any critical ill patient,  intubation may result in a further drop in heart rate and blood pressure via vagal stimulation. It is crucial to have adequate resuscitation prior to intubation. IV crystalloid fluids , IV atropine (up to three 1mg doses), as well as push dose epinephrine are interventions that can be used quickly at bedside to maintain circulation and heart rate while further investigations and treatments can be organized. [5,8]


Specific Treatments

For a severe CCB poisoning in which hypotension is refractory to IV fluids and atropine, all of the following treatments should be administered simultaneously. If the severity is milder, these treatments should be approached in a stepwise fashion, progressing to the next if the preceding treatment is ineffective. [5]

IV Calcium salt:

As a first line recommendation, a calcium chloride bolus (10-20mL 10%) followed by a continuous infusion (0.5 mEq Ca2+/kg/hr) or the equivalent of calcium gluconate is recommended, though often ineffective. [5] Mortality has been shown to be reduced with its administration, and hypercalcemia occurs only rarely. [7] [8]

IV Insulin with dextrose:

High-dose insulin therapy (1 u/kg bolus and 0.5 u/kg/hr infusion up to 10 u/kg/hr) has been shown to be safe and effective at improving hemodynamics, though response is delayed for 30-60 minutes. [5,7] It should be used with calcium and a vasopressor in the presence of myocardial dysfunction. [8] Blood glucose levels should be monitored every 15-30 minutes for hypoglycemia, and 50mL boluses of dextrose (D50W) given accordingly to maintain levels above 8.25 mM. [5] Hypokalemia is another risk of insulin therapy, therefore electrolytes should be monitored every 30 minutes and 20 mEq of potassium chloride given if needed. [5,7]

IV Vasopressor:

Administration of IV epinephrine has shown improvement in cardiac output. [7,8] In the setting of severe CCB poisoning, doses as high as 150mcg per minute of epinephrine may be needed. It is suggested to start the infusion at 2mcg per minute and titrate up to a systolic blood pressure of 100 mmHg, or a MAP of 65 mmHg. [5] These higher doses may result in a large improvement in patient MAP with minimal change in heart rate.

IV Lipid emulsion therapy:

If the patient is refractory to first-line treatments above, or upon consultation with medical toxicology centre, IV lipid emulsion therapy may be recommended. [8] Most commonly, this is given as a bolus of 1.5 mL/kg of 20% lipid emulsion, repeated up to every three minutes for three total boluses. An infusion of 0.25-0.5 mL/kg/minute may be started. [5] Complications of this treatment are still being studied.

Other considerations:

Studies most often show improvement of hemodynamics and no adverse effects with temporary cardiac pacing for bradycardia refractory to first-line treatments. [7,8] Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation may also be necessary if the patient is near cardiac arrest and remains refractory to previous treatments. [8] Dialysis provides no benefit. [5]

Decontamination:

If the patient is asymptomatic and/or hemodynamically stable, 50g of activated charcoal should be given. In the case of ingestion of extended-release CCBs, whole bowel irrigation should be performed regardless of the presence of symptoms. An asymptomatic patient should be monitored for 6-8 hours for immediate release and 24 hours for extended release forms. [5,8]

Investigations:

ECG may reveal PR interval prolongation due to CCB actions on the SA and AV nodes. Frequent blood glucose measurements are crucial to monitor for the effects of insulin treatment and the need for glucose replacement. Serum electrolytes, notably potassium levels, must be assessed for developed hypokalemia secondary to insulin treatment.



Conclusion:

We present a case and review the physiology of a severe calcium channel blocker poisoning. Key considerations in managing a CCB poisoning include specific dosage and form, initial resuscitation with a low threshold for intubation, fluids, and atropine. Further treatments will be required based on severity, such as intravenous calcium, insulin with dextrose, and lipid emulsion therapy, all of which should be initiated promptly if there is concern for massive over dose and patient declining. Other considerations include the need for further vasopressors and temporary cardiac pacing.

 


FIGURE: Society of Critical Care Medicine key recommendations for management of CCB poisoning. Source: “Experts consensus recommendations for the management of calcium channel blocker poisoning in adults.” Crit Care Med. 2017;45(3):e306-e315. DOI: 10.1097/CCM.0000000000002087


 

References:

[1] Elliott, WJ & Ram,CV. J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2011;13:687–689.

[2] Eisenberg, MJ; Brox, A. & Bestawros, AN. Am J Med. 2004;116(1):35-42.

[3] Singh, BN; Hecht, HS; Nademanee, K. & Chew, CYC. Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases. 1982;15(2):103-132.

[4] Russell, RP. Hypertension. 1988;11(3):II42-44.

[5] Barrueto, F. “Calcium channel blocker poisoning.” UpToDate. 2019.

[6] Hofer, CA; Smith, JL & Tenholder, MF. Am J Med. 1993;95(4):431.

[7] St-Onge, M; Dubé, PA; Gosselin, S; Guimont, C; Godwin, J; Archambault, PM; Chauny, JM; Frenette, AJ; Darveau, M; Le Sage, N; Poitras, J; Provencher, J; Juurlink, DN & Blais, R. Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2014;52(9):926.

[8] St-Onge, M; Anseeuw, K; Cantrell, FL; Gilchrist, IC; Hantson, P; Bailey, B; Lavergne, V; Gosselin, S; Kerns, W; Laliberté, M; Lavonas, EJ; Juurlink, DN; Muscedere, J; Yang, CC; Sinuff, T; Rieder, M & Mégarbane, B. “Experts consensus recommendations for the management of calcium channel blocker poisoning in adults.” Crit Care Med. 2017;45(3):e306-e315.

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EM Reflections – June 2019 – Part 1

Thanks to Dr. Joanna Middleton for leading the discussions this month

Edited by Dr David Lewis 


Discussion Topics

  1. When is a pregnancy not a pregnancy?
  2. Caustic Ingestions
  3. Transient Ischemic Attack – Emergency Medicine (see part 2)

When is a pregnancy not a pregnancy?

Molar Pregnancy

Hydatidiform mole (molar pregnancy) is a relatively rare complication of fertilization with an incidence in the United States of 0.63 to 1.1 per 1000 pregnancies, although rates vary geographically. It is included in the spectrum of gestational trophoblastic diseases and is comprised of both complete molar pregnancies (CM) and partial molar pregnancies (PM).

The most well characterized risk factor for CM is extreme of maternal age. Maternal ages less than 20 or greater than 40 years have been associated with relative risks for CM as high as 10- and 11-fold greater respectively. Other potential risk factors include oral contraceptive use, maternal type A or AB blood groups, maternal smoking, and maternal alcohol abuse.

Molar pregnancy typically presents in the first trimester and may be associated with a wide array of findings, including vaginal bleeding (most common), uterine size larger than expected according to pregnancy date (CM), uterine size smaller than expected according to pregnancy date (PM), excessive beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hcg) levels, anemia, hyperemesis gravidum, theca lutein cysts, pre-eclampsia, and respiratory distress.Studies comparing modern clinical presentations of CM with historical presentations have demonstrated a significant reduction in many of the classic presenting signs and symptoms such as vaginal bleeding and excessive uterine size. This reduction is attributed to early detection by transvaginal ultrasound and increasingly sensitive β-hcg assays. Numerous studies evaluating the efficacy of ultrasound in detecting molar pregnancy demonstrate a 57–95 percent sensitivity for the detection of CM compared to only 18–49 percent sensitivity for PM.

More here: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2791738/

PoCUS – Normal Early Pregnancy

Arrow = Yolk sac (YS) within Gestational sac (GS), note the hyperechoic decidual reaction surrounding GS, Arrow head = Fetal Pole

PoCUS – Molar Pregnancy

 

PoCUS SIgns:

  • enlarged uterus
  • may be seen as an intrauterine mass with cystic spaces without any associated fetal parts
    • the multiple cystic structures classically give a “snow storm” or “bunch of grapes” type appearance.
  • may be difficult to diagnose in the first trimester 6
    • may appear similar to a normal pregnancy or as an empty gestational sac
    • <50% are diagnosed in the first trimester
  • More on Radiopedia.org

Useful post from County EM blog- click here

 


Caustic Ingestions

 

 

Hydrochloric Acid – pH 1-2

Dangerous if pH <2 or >11.5-12

For alkaline – higher percent, shorter time to burn – 10%NaOH – 1 min of contact to produce deep burn, 30% within seconds

 

Acid – painful to swallow so usually less volume, bad taste so more gagging/laryngeal injury, more aqueous so less esophageal injury, pylorospasm prevents entry into duodenum producing stagnation and prominent antrum injury.  Food is protective.  Acid ingestion typically produces a superficial coagulation necrosis that thromboses the underlying mucosal blood vessels and consolidates the connective tissue, thereby forming a protective eschar.  In enough amount – perforation.

Alkali – burns esophagus more, neutralized in stomach.  Liquefaction necrosis.

Management

Decontamination: Activated charcoal / GI decontamination / neutralisation procedures are contraindicated

Obtaining meaningful info from endoscopy after treatment with charcoal is very difficult

If asymptomatic – observe, trial of oral intake at 4 hours after exposure, earlier if low suspicion or likely benign ingestion after discussion with Poisons Centre

Symptomatic patients or those with a significant ingestion

(high-concentration acid or alkali or high volume [>200 ml] of a low-concentration acid or alkali)

Upper GI endoscopy should be performed early (3 to 48 hrs) and preferably during the first 24 hrs after ingestion to evaluate extent of esophageal and gastric damage and guide management.  Endoscopy is contraindicated in patients who have evidence of GI perforation. (Ingestion of >60 mL of concentrated HCl leads to severe injury to the GI tract with necrosis and perforation, rapid onset of MODS and is usually fatal – endoscopy within 24 hours (unless asymptomatic at 4 hours)

Complications – 1/3 develop strictures – directly related to depth/severity of injury, years later

 


 

TAKE HOME POINTS

  1. PV Bleed, Hyperemesis, PoCUS = bunch Grapes or Snowstorm – consider Molar Pregnancy
  2. Don’t use Activated Charcoal for Caustic Ingestions
  3. Discuss Caustic Ingestions with Poisons Centre
  4. Consider early endoscopy
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