>What’s the word? Insertion of Word catheter for Bartholin’s cysts

Resident Clinical Pearl (RCP) February 2019

Renee AmiroPGY3 FMEM Dalhousie University, Saint John NB

Reviewed by Dr. David Lewis. Copyedited by Dr. Mandy Peach

Bartholin gland are located in the vulva and are a common cause of vulvar masses.
The normal function of the Bartholin gland is to secret mucus to lubricate the vagina. These ducts can get blocked and cause fluid accumulation can cause a cyst or abscess.

Anatomy of the vagina (2)
Identifying a bartholin gland cyst (3)

Treatment:
The mainstay of management is incision and drainage with insertion of a ward catheter. The ward catheter allows the cyst to continue to drain and allow re-epithelization of the Bartholin gland allowing the duct to stay patent in future.

Indications:
Presence of an uncomplicated Bartholin’s cyst.

Contraindications:
Latex allergy – the ward catheter is made with latex.

Materials:
Alcohol swabs or other solution to clean the area.
Sterile gloves
Local anesthetic
Scalpel with an 11 blade
Gauze (+++)
Haemostat to breakup loculations
Culture swab
Ward Catheter
Syringe filled with H2O to fill the ward catheter.

Procedure

  1. Sterilize area with sterilizing solution.
  2. Inject local anesthetic in to the area that you are going to stab for the incision ~1-3cc.
  3. Stab the cyst or abscess. Make the incision about 5mm big and 1.5cm deep. Too big an incision could cause the ward catheter to fall out.
  4. Drain the cyst/abscess and breakup any loculations with the haemostat.
  5. Place the ward catheter into the incision and inflate with 2-3cc of water.
  6. Tuck the end of the ward catheter in to the vagina to minimize discomfort.
Technique for insertion of word catheter (4)

Follow up:
Pelvic rest for the duration of the time the ward catheter is in place.
Sitz baths and mild analgesia (Tylenol/Advil)

Duration of ward catheter placement is on average four weeks.

If the ward catheter falls out prior to the tract being re-epithelialized or the cyst or abscess remains the patient may need another placement of the ward catheter or follow up marsupialization procedure (obstetrics). If the area looks well healed, the ward catheter can be kept out.

Role of antibiotics:
In uncomplicated skin abscesses there has been no benefit shown from antibiotic treatment. Using an antibiotic without and I and D will not heal the Bartholin glad cyst.

Antibiotics indicated in:
High risk of complicated infection – surrounding cellulitis, pregnancy, immunocompromised.
Culture positive MRSA
Signs of systemic infection

Bottom Line:

  1. Ward catheter placement is essential if you are going to drain a Bartholin’s abscess. If you don’t the patient may loose patency of the duct which could have long term consequences such as dyspareunia.
  2. Antibiotics alone will not cure a Bartholin’s abscess. Only indicated in limited situations.

References

  1. Uptodate: Bartholin gland masses: Diagnosis and Management https://www.uptodate.com/contents/bartholin-gland-masses-diagnosis-and-management?search=bartholin%20cyst&source=search_result&selectedTitle=1~10&usage_type=default&display_rank=1
  2. Bartholin Gland Cysts: https://www.health.harvard.edu/a_to_z/bartholins-gland-cyst-a-to-z
  3. Bartholin Gland Cysts: https://www.merckmanuals.com/en-ca/home/women-s-health-issues/noncancerous-gynecologic-abnormalities/bartholin-gland-cysts
  4. Bartholin Gland Abscess or Cyst Incision and Drainage: https://accessemergencymedicine.mhmedical.com/content.aspx?bookid=683&sectionid=45343783

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