PoCUS in Early Pregnancy – a review

PoCUS in Early Pregnancy – a Resident Clinical Pearl (RCP)

Dr. Victoria Landry, R3

Integrated Family Medicine Emergency Medicine Program

Saint John, NB

Edited by Dr. Rawan AlRashed, PoCUS fellow

Copyedited by Dr. Mandy Peach

PoCUS use by the emergency physician for the diagnosis of uncomplicated intrauterine pregnancy have been proven to be affective in expiditing patient management and decreasing the length of stay in the emergency department. In a metanlaysis done by Stein et.al. emergency physiscain performed PoCUS was found to be 99.3% sensitive in ruling out ectopic pregnancy by detecting an Intauterine pregnancy (IUP). In this review, ultrasound findings in the first trimester will be highlighted.

Indication: Confirmed or suspected pregnancy with abdominal pain, vaginal bleeding, syncope, or hypotension(2)

Technique

Start with trans-abdominal ultrasound (TAUS) (1,2)

  • Use abdominal probe (deep penetration, wide field view; use “obstetrics” or “gynecology” preset)
  • Acoustic window is a full bladder (anechoic structure in the near field). Uterus is a homogenous structure beneath bladder
  • Place abdominal probe midline longitudinally/sagitally immediately superior to symphysis pubis with probe marker toward patient’s head. Adjust depth so uterus is in middle of screen. Sweep left and right till uterus disappears in each view.
  • Rotate probe 90° into transverse plane with marker toward patient’s right side. Sweep up and down till uterus disappears in each view.
  • To improve image: Turn the gain down, sweep slowly

Then Consider the use of transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS) if available, and qualified to use  (1)

  • Requires empty bladder, Patient in lithotomy position.
  • Ultrasound gel on probe, latex condom over top (ensure no air bubbles), then sterile lubricant
  • Reference mark toward ceiling (in sagittal orientation), insert 4-5cm into vagina, sweep left and right
  • Turn probe 90° C to be in coronal plane and marker to the right of the patient – sweep anterior and posterior

General principles (1)

  • follow the endometrial stripe (echogenic line within uterus) along its entire course (left to right in longitudinal view, cervix to fundus in transverse view), looking for evidence of a pregnancy
  • You are trying to rule in an intrauterine pregnancy (IUP) (as opposed to rule out an ectopic) – assume all pregnancies are ectopic until proven otherwise(2)

 

Figure 1 – Longitudinal/sagittal view (TAUS): (1)

Figure 2 – Transverse view (TAUS): (1)

Discrimination zone (βHCG levels below which you cannot see an IUP)(2, 3)

  • TVUS – βHCG 1500-2000 mlU/ml
  • TAUS – βHCG 5000-6000 mlU/ml
  • If No definite IUP (NDIUP) above these levels, strongly consider ectopic!

Findings:

Inutrauterine pregnancy

  • The “double ring sign is the earliest sign of a definitive IUP. Diagnosing an intrauterine pregnancy (IUP) requires visualization of all 3 structures inside the uterus. (1,2)
  • Decidual reaction – hyperechoic (white) line in uterus (2) represents endometrium thickening – begins around day 14 post-fertilization (1)
  • Gestational sac – anechoic (black) round area within decidual reaction, contains amniotic fluid, seen at 4-5wks (TVUS), 6wks (TAUS) (2)
  • Yolk sac +/- fetal pole within the gestational sac(2)
    • Yolk sac: circular echogenic layer, looks like a cheerio, visible when gestational sac is 10mm by TVUS (~5-6wks GA), 20mm by TAUS (~6-7wks GA) (1)
    • Fetal pole: echogenic structure; develops around the same time as yolk sac but visualized on US ~1wk later(1)

Figure 3 – Double ring sign(1)

Figure 4 – Double ring sign(4)

Figure 5 – Fetal pole(1)

Measurements

Mean sac diameter

  • Obtain sagittal view of gestational sac, measure height and length of sac using mean sac diameter calculation package, rotate probe 90º to obtain transverse view of gestational sac, measure width of sac
  • MSD (mm) + 30 = Gestational age (days)

 

Crown-rump length (CRL) = Top of skull to base of pelvis(1)

  • >5mm without visible fetal heart = unlikely to proceed to viability
  • CRL (mm) + 42 = gestational age (days)
  • The most accurate method of dating the pregnancy(3)

 

Fetal cardiac activity = proof of live IUP(1)

  • detectable ~6wks on TVUS (fetal pole is >5mm), 7-8wks on TAUS (fetal pole is >10mm) (1)
  • Normal IUP with fetal cardiac activity is reassuring!
    • absence of cardiac activity will likely result in miscarriage, presence of cardiac activity reduces risk of miscarriage (HR >100 consistent with good fetal outcome)
  • Technique(3)
    • Locate fetal pole, optimize depth, turn on M-mode (never doppler as it subjects fetus to high US energy and may be harmful)(1,2), place caliper over beating heart, measure and calculate heart rate
    • Note: must be within gestational sac, well away from uterine wall (don’t confuse with highly vascular decidual reaction)(1)
    • Normal FHR Ranges
      • 6-7wks: 100-120bpm
      • 8wks: 145-170bpm
      • 9+wks: 120-160bpm

 

Other findings and descriptions

No definitive intrauterine pregnancy (NDIUP) (2)

  • if any single criteria of IUP is missing

DDx for NDIUP(2):

  • Early normal pregnancy (βHCG below discrimination zone)
  • Threatened/spontaneous abortion
  • Anembryonic pregnancy (blighted ovum)
  • Molar pregnancy
  • Ectopic pregnancy

Threatened abortion: abnormal bleeding during pregnancy; normal IUP on US(3)

Inevitable abortion: vaginal bleeding with open os; normal IUP or product of conception (POC) near cervix on US(3)

Incomplete abortion: open os with retained POC; US shows anything from debris to embryo; abnormal uterine contents confirms dx(1)

Complete abortion: empty uterus + positive βHCG +/- closed os; same findings as for ectopic therefore requires formal US + serial βHCG(1)

Ectopic pregnancy (3)

  • NDIUP (no definitive intrauterine pregnancy) above βHCG in discriminatory zone
  • Scan adnexa for signs of ectopic
    • Tubal ring sign (thick hyperechoic ring around a tubal mass)
    • Ring of fire sign (also seen in corpus luteum cysts; high velocity flow seen on color doppler around the
    • gestational sac + fetal pole with cardiac activity outside the uterus is diagnostic of an ectopic
  • assess pouch of douglas for free fluid
  • suspicious for ectopic: ectopic mass, fluid in cul de sac, absent IUP, abnormal βHCG pattern (normally rises at least 50% in 48hr period)

Corpus luteal cyst(2,3)

  • develops due to growth, instead of normal regression, of corpus luteum
  • appears very similar to ectopic, but will move with the ovary in response to transducer manipulation instead of independent, tubal ring is thinner and less echogenic, cystic fluid is more clear and anechoic (rather than “clumpy” with echoes)
  • ovarian cyst characteristics: outside the uterus, circular, well circumscribed, do not taper to solid organs

Blighted ovum (anembryonic pregnancy)(1,2)

  • abnormally large gestational sac with no embryonic contents
    • gestational sac >20mm without yolk sac visible à suspect blighted ovum
    • >25mm without yolk sac visible à blighted ovum virtually certain (Eliminates diagnosis of ectopic)
  • Positive βHCG (higher than expected for GA)
  • Confirm with formal US

Molar pregnancy (1,3)

  • Tumor due to uncontrolled proliferation of trophoblasts (cells that surround blastocyst and later become the placenta)
  • Complete mole: no fetal/embryonic tissue; abnormally elevated βHCG >100,000 mIU/ml
  • Partial mole: may contain (abnormal) fetal structures
  • Presentation: hyperemesis, larger uterus than expected, vaginal bleeding, anemia, signs of hyperthyroidism, pregnancy-induced hypertension
  • US: appears as a “snowstorm” or “cluster of grapes” in uterus – fairly homogenous mass full of small, fluid-filled (black) holes; no detectable fetal cardiac activity
  • Needs gyne referral for surgical evacuation(2)

Pitfalls

  • Pseudogestational sac (1, 3)
    • contains no yolk sac, usually more irregularly shaped or pointy-edged than a true gestational sac, border is not as echogenic, and fluid may contain some echoes
    • Intrauterine fluid collections occur in 9-20% of ectopic pregnancies
    • Unless all 3 criteria met for double ring sign, pt requires formal US
  • Extrauterine pregnancy(1)
    • Recognize uterine tissue and always confirm bladder-uterus juxtaposition(2)
  • Interstitial and cornual ectopic pregnancies(1)
    • Rare but dangerous – tend to rupture later therefore produce more rapid hemorrhage than other ectopics
    • Myometrium around interstitial and cornual pregnancies is thin and uneven(2)
    • Measure the “myometrial mantle” (the thinnest part of myometrium around the gestational sac) – should be >5-7mm thick (thinner is concerning for cornual or interstitial ectopic pregnancy) (2)
  • Multiple pregnancies(2)
    • In multiple gestation, each fetus needs to meet the criteria for IUP
    • Heterotopic pregnancies = combined IUP and ectopic pregnancy
      • Risk is 1:30,000 in general population
      • Risk increases to 1:100 with fertility treatment (e.g. IVF)

Figure 7 – Extrauterine pregnancy(1)

Figure 8 – Normal myometrial mantle(1)

Figure 9 – Cornual ectopic pregnancy(1)

Key points(1)

  • False positive IUP can have devastating consequences
  • Any positive βHCG + no definitive IUP = presumed ectopic
    • Pt stable + no free fluid à formal US + quantitative βHCG
      • If no ectopic mass, repeat formal US and βHCG in 48hrs with consideration of patient risk of ectopic pregnancy
      • Follow up with OB to be arranged
    • Always consider other diffrerntail diagnosis for patient presentation before discharging them home.

Figure 10 – Clinical application(2)

 

References:

  1. Socransky, S., & Wiss, R. (2016). Obstetrical EDE. In Essentials of point-of-care ultrasound: The EDE book (pp. 61-90). The EDE 2 Course.
  2. Long, N. (2020, March 02). VanPOCUS: 1st Trimester Obstetrics • LITFL • Ultrasound Library. Retrieved October 15, 2020, from https://litfl.com/vanpocus-1st-trimester-obstetrics/
  3. Dinh, V. (n.d.). Obstetric/OB Ultrasound Made Easy: Step-By-Step Guide. Retrieved October 15, 2020, from https://www.pocus101.com/obstetric-ob-ultrasound-made-easy-step-by-step-guide/
  4. Flores, B., Smith, T., & Joseph, J. (n.d.). OB/Gyn. Retrieved October 15, 2020, from https://www.thepocusatlas.com/obgyn-1

 

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Alternative Rib Fracture Management in the ED

Alternative Rib Fracture Management in the ED – A Medical Student Clinical Pearl

Victoria Mercer, Clinical Clerk 3, DMNB

Reviewed and Copyedited by Dr. Mandy Peach

Rib fractures are a frequent presentation in the ED, occuring in approximately 10% of all injured patients with the primary causes being blunt chest trauma and MVAs(1,2).  The mainstay of treatment for rib fractures is analgesic control(1). When pain cannot be adequately managed, the patient is at a heightened risk of hypoventilation due to decreased thoracic mobility and secretion clearance, predisposing the patient to significant atelectasis(1,2).

Historically the pain from rib fractures has been managed with acetaminophen or NSAIDS and if these do not sufficiently alleviate the pain, opioids are used(1,3). Unfortunately, these methods often do not provide adequate pain control or in the case of opioids, come with a myriad of side effects such as nausea, vomiting, constipation, respiratory depression and the potential for dependency and abuse (1,4).

An alternative to traditional methods include regional techniques such as paravertebral or epidural nerve blocks. These interventions have been shown to effectively control pain in rib fractures(3,4). The downside to these interventions include being technically challenging and time consuming with significant complication risks and contraindications such as coagulation disorders (1,3).

The solution? A serratus anterior block 

An ultrasound guided blockade of the lateral cutaneous branches of the thoracic intercostal nerves was first described by Blanco et al. in 2013 for patients following breast surgery to manage their postoperative pain(5). This procedure has been adopted by many emergency departments for its convenience and practicality compared to epidural or paravertebral nerve blocks(3).

Serratus anterior blocks are less invasive and considerably more practical in the ED setting, providing paresthesia to the ipsilateral hemithorax for 12-36 hours (6).

The only absolute contraindications are patient refusal, allergy to local anesthetic and local infection(1).

Complications of a serratus anterior block include pneumothorax, vascular puncture, nerve damage, failure/inadequate block, local anesthetic toxicity and infection(1).

Serratus anterior blocks are only effective for the anterior two-thirds of the chest wall (3).

 

Figure 1. Ultrasound image of serratus anterior muscle and surrounding tissues with superficial or deep needle guides. Image from Thiruvenkatarajan V, Cruz Eng H, Adhikary SD. An update on regional analgesia for rib fractures. Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology. 2018;31(5):601–607.

How do you do it?

The procedure is usually performed with the patient laying supine however the patient could also lay in a lateral decubitus position (1,3). Using a high frequency linear ultrasound probe (6-13MHz), identify the serratus anterior and latissimus dorsi muscles over the fifth rib in the mid-axillary line(1,3). Using an in-plane approach, insert the needle either superficial or deep to the serratus anterior and confirm correct needle placement by visualizing anaesthetic spread via ultrasound(1,3). According to May et al., superficial spreading tends to have a longer lasting analgesic effect(1). Place and secure a catheter to infuse the remainder of the bolus(1,3). Thiruvenkatarajan et al. recommend a bolus of 40ml of 0.25% levobupivacaine and a 50mm 18G Tuohy catheter needle(3).

See this excellent review by Dr. David Lewis on identifying rib fractures and their complications using ultrasound (start 3:08) as well as a review of the block and procedure (start 8:00)

Rib Fractures and Serratus Anterior Plane Block

References

  1.         May L, Hillermann C, Patil S. Rib fracture management. BJA Education. 2016 Jan 1;16(1):26–32.
  2.         Malekpour M, Hashmi A, Dove J, Torres D, Wild J. Analgesic choice in management of rib fractures: Paravertebral block or epidural analgesia? Anesthesia and Analgesia. 2017 Jun 1;124(6):1906–11.
  3.         Thiruvenkatarajan V, Cruz Eng H, Adhikary S das. An update on regional analgesia for rib fractures. Vol. 31, Current opinion in anaesthesiology. 2018. p. 601–7.
  4.         Tekşen Ş, Öksüz G, Öksüz H, Sayan M, Arslan M, Urfalıoğlu A, et al. Analgesic efficacy of the serratus anterior plane block in rib fractures pain: A randomized controlled trial. American Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2021 Mar 1;41:16–20.
  5.         Blanco R, Parras T, McDonnell JG, Prats-Galino A. Serratus plane block: A novel ultrasound-guided thoracic wall nerve block. Anaesthesia. 2013 Nov;68(11):1107–13.
  6.         Mayes J, Davison E, Panahi P, Patten D, Eljelani F, Womack J, et al. An anatomical evaluation of the serratus anterior plane block. Anaesthesia [Internet]. 2016 Sep 1 [cited 2021 Apr 18];71(9):1064–9. Available from: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/anae.13549

 

 

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Rib Fractures and Serratus Anterior Plane Block

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Scaphoid Fracture – Can PoCUS disrupt the traditional ‘splint and wait’ pathway?

 

PoCUS Fellow Pearl

Dr. Melanie Leclerc, CCFP-EM

MSK PoCUS Fellow

Dalhousie University Department of Emergency Medicine

 

Reviewed & Edited by Dr David Lewis (@e_med_doc)

All case histories are illustrative and not based on any individual


 

Case:

A 37 year old, right hand dominant, carpenter presents to your local ED with a complaint of right wrist pain. He was on a step-stool and lost his balance earlier today. He fell landing on his outstretched arm and had an acute-onset of radial-sided wrist pain. He denies any other injury. There are no neurologic complaints.

On exam, there is no visible deformity. The skin is closed and there is some swelling noted. The patient is tender over the anatomic snuff box as well as volarly over the scaphoid. There is pain noted with axial loading of the thumb. There is no other tenderness. ROM is within normal limits. The limb is distally neurovascularly intact.


X-rays are normal.

An occult scaphoid fracture is suspected. At this institution, patients with suspected occult scaphoid fracture are placed in a thumb spica splint and referred to the local hand surgeon to be seen in ~10-14 days for repeat assessment and X-ray.

Can Point of Care Ultrasound change this traditional “splint and wait” patient pathway?


 

Background:

Scaphoid fracture is a common presentation to the Emergency Department accounting for approximately 15% of all wrist injuries and 70% of carpal fractures. Up to 30% of the time, radiographs at initial presentation appear normal making fracture a commonly missed injury for Emergency physicians. A failure to recognize this injury can lead to chronic pain and functional impairment for patients. Particularly, fractures of the proximal pole (most distant to the blood supply) can lead to avascular necrosis (AVN) at high rates. Non-union can lead to scaphoid non-union advanced collapse (SNAC wrist) which can perpetuate further degenerative changes throughout the carpus. This can cause a significant impact on quality of life and occupation. Early detection of fracture could expedite fixation and possibly results in better outcomes. Further study in this area is needed.


 

Anatomy:

The scaphoid bone lies in the radial aspect of the proximal carpal row. It’s unique shape (“twisted peanut”), lends to easy recognition. It articulates proximally with the distal radius, distally with the trapezium, and on its’ ulnar aspect with the lunate to form the scapho-lunate interval. The blood supply to the scaphoid is unique in that the majority of it is retrograde. The dorsal carpal branch of the radial artery supplies the bone from distal to proximal. A small proportion of the blood supply originates at the proximal end. The boundary between the two supplies creates a “watershed” area prone to non-union and AVN.


 

Classification of Fractures:

Scaphoid fractures are classified by location. These regions are the proximal, middle and distal thirds which account for 20%, 75%, and 5% of the fractures respectively. The stability of fractures is determined by the displacement (>1mm) and angulation (scapholunate angle >60 and radiolunate angle >15). The Hebert Classification as endorsed by Traumapedia can be found below.


 

Traditional Imaging:

Imaging of these suspected injuries varies. Traditionally serial X-rays were used, but have been found to be poorly sensitive even several weeks after injury. Bone scan has also been used as an alternative due to it’s high sensitivity, but has poor specificity and provides no further information regarding the nature of the fracture. CT is relatively sensitive and specific and provides information for pre-operative planning. MRI is considered the gold standard, but is difficult to obtain in a timely manner in Canada.

Bäcker HC, Wu CH, Strauch RJ. Systematic Review of Diagnosis of Clinically Suspected Scaphoid Fractures. J Wrist Surg. 2020 Feb;9(1):81-89. doi: 10.1055/s-0039-1693147. Epub 2019 Jul 21. PMID: 32025360; PMCID: PMC7000269.


 

PoCUS Technique:

  • Linear probe

  • Consider waterbath, gel standoff pad, or bag of IV fluid

  • Scan with the wrist ulnarly deviated

  • Scan in the longitudinal and transverse orientations of volar, lateral and dorsal aspects

  • Place the probe in longitudinal orientation dorsally over lister’s tubercle of the radius and scan distally until the scaphoid is visualized in the snuff box. Scan radial to ulnar.

  • Rotate to the transverse orientation and scan through proximal to distal

  • Volarly, in the transverse plane, identify the tendon of the flexor carpi radialis (this lies radial to the easily identifiable palmaris longus tendon on exam). The scaphoid is found deep to this. Scan proximal to distal.

  • Rotate to the longitudinal orientation and scan radial to ulnar

 


 

Video Demonstration:

 


 

Findings:

  • Cortical disruption

  • Periosteal elevation

  • Hematoma


 

The Evidence:

  • Early advanced imaging (CT or MRI) compared to initial 2 week immobilisation proved more cost effective and had better patient oriented outcomes (ie. missed work).(7)
  • A systematic review and meta analysis of moderate to high quality studies published in 2018 found that ultrasound had a mean sensitivity of ~89% and specificity of ~90% for detection of occult scaphoid fractures.(1)
  • Similar results were also reported by another systematic review in 2018.(8)
  • Pocus was shown to have a comparable sensitivity to CT for occult scaphoid in a systematic review published in 2020.(2)

 

Limitations:

  • Only useful if positive
  • Operator experience dependent
  • US probe and frequency dependant
  • Potential for false positives due to injury of nearby structure causing hematoma
  • Potential for false positives in context of arthritis or remote trauma

 

Bottom line:

  • Useful if positive
  • Still need definitive test to further delineate fracture (ie: for operative planning)
  • Could expedite CT
  • Could expedite specialist follow-up
  • May improve ER physician diagnostic certainty
  • May improve patient trust and compliance with splinting
  • Further study is needed

 

Case Conclusion:

Scaphoid cortical disruption was visualized using PoCUS. After discussion with the hand surgeon, a CT Scan of the wrist was performed which confirmed a minimally displaced waste fracture of the scaphoid. The patient was splinted and seen the next day in clinic for discussion regarding operative management.


 

Further Review:

 

 


 

References

  1. Ali M, Ali M, Mohamed A, Mannan S, Fallahi F. The role of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of occult scaphoid fractures J Ultrason 2018; 18: 325–331.
  2. Bäcker HC, Wu CH, Strauch RJ. Systematic Review of Diagnosis of Clinically Suspected Scaphoid Fractures. J Wrist Surg. 2020 Feb;9(1):81-89.
  3. Bakur A. Jamjoom, Tim R.C. Davis. Why scaphoid fractures are missed. A review of 52 medical negligence cases, Injury, Volume 50, Issue 7, 2019, Pages 1306-1308.
  4. Carpenter CR et al. Adult Scaphoid Fracture. Acad Emerg Med 2014; 21(2): 101-121.
  5. Gibney B, Smith B, Moughty A, Kavanagh EC, Hynes D and MacMahon PJ American Journal of Roentgenology 2019 213:5, 1117-1123
  1. Jenkins PJ, Slade K, Huntley JS, Robinson CM. A comparative analysis of the accuracy, diagnostic uncertainty and cost of imaging modalities in suspected scaphoid fractures. Injury. 2008;39:768–774.
  2. Karl, John W. MD, MPH1; Swart, Eric MD1; Strauch, Robert J. MD1 Diagnosis of Occult Scaphoid Fractures, The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery: November 18, 2015 – Volume 97 – Issue 22 – p 1860-1868.
  3. Kwee, R.M., Kwee, T.C. Ultrasound for diagnosing radiographically occult scaphoid fracture. Skeletal Radiol 47, 1205–1212 (2018).
  4. Malahias MA, Nikolaou VS, Chytas D, Kaseta MK, Babis GC. Accuracy and Interobserver and Intraobserver Reliability of Ultrasound in the Early Diagnosis of Occult Scaphoid Fractures: Diagnostic Criteria and a Way of Interpretation. Journal of Surgical Orthopaedic Advances. 2019 ;28(1):1-9.
  5. Mallee WH, Wang J, Poolman RW, Kloen P, Maas M, de Vet HCW, Doornberg JN. Computed tomography versus magnetic resonance imaging versus bone scintigraphy for clinically suspected scaphoid fractures in patients with negative plain radiographs. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2015, Issue 6.
  6. Mallee, W.H., Mellema, J.J., Guitton, T.G. et al. 6-week radiographs unsuitable for diagnosis of suspected scaphoid fractures. Arch Orthop Trauma Surg 136, 771–778 (2016).
  7. Melville, D., Jacobson, J.A., Haase, S. et al. Ultrasound of displaced ulnar collateral ligament tears of the thumb: the Stener lesion revisited. Skeletal Radiol 42, 667–673 (2013).
  8. Meyer, P., Lintingre, P.-F., Pesquer, L., Poussange, N., Silvestre, A., & Dallaudiere, B. (2018). Imaging of Wrist Injuries: A Standardized US Examination in Daily Practice. Journal of the Belgian Society of Radiology, 102(1), 9.
  9. Mohomad et al. 2019. Accuracy of the common practice of doing X-rays after two weeks in detecting scaphoid fractures. A retrospective cohort study. Hong Kong Journal of Orthopaedic Research 2019; 2(1): 01-06.
  10. Neubauer J, Benndorf M, Ehritt-Braun C, et al. Comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography and radiography for scaphoid fractures. Sci Rep 2018; 8:3906.
  11. Ravikant Jain, Nikhil Jain, Tanveer Sheikh, Charanjeet Yadav. 2018. Early scaphoid fractures are better diagnosed with ultrasonography than X-rays: A prospective study over 114 patients, Chinese Journal of Traumatology, Volume 21, Issue 4, Pages 206-210.
  12. Senall, JA, Failla, JM, Bouffard, JL. 2004. Ultrasound for the early diagnosis of clinically suspected scaphoid fracture. J Hand Surg Am, 29:400-405.
  13. https://essr.org/content-essr/uploads/2016/10/wrist.pdf
  14. http://www.bonetalks.com/scaphoid
  15. https://radiopaedia.org/articles/scaphoid-fracture
  16. https://sketchymedicine.com/2014/07/scaphoid-bone-anatomy-and-fractures/
  17. https://radiopaedia.org/cases/scaphoid-fracture-11?lang=gb
  18. https://www.orthobullets.com/hand/6034/scaphoid-fracture
  19. https://meeting.handsurgery.org/abstracts/2018/EP15.cgi
  20. https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Bone-scintigraphy-patient-C-of-the-hands-the-patient-with-a-scaphoid-fracture-on-the_fig4_50399987
  21. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7pCXiRQMRKo&t=5s&ab_channel=UltrasoundPod
  22. https://litfl.com/terry-thomas-sign
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